Music

Music

There have always been many fronts on which the battle to crown the song of the summer is fought. The biggest song on pop radio isn't always the song that sells the most. The lyric that lends itself to the season can sometimes be overwhelmed by a hook that sounds best coming out of a car window.

The new Soulrocker album features songs that infuse acoustic, electronic, reggae, dancehall and natural elements, all with the message of people coming together to support each other and the planet. KSUT will play it in its entirety, Friday at noon, as a warm up to our 40th Anniversary Celebration on 8/6! 

Let The Games Begin: A Playlist For Rio

Aug 5, 2016

The music of Johann Sebastian Bach is essential, like air and water, for many classical musicians. Pianist András Schiff starts every day with Bach — sometimes before breakfast. "It's like taking care of your inner hygiene. There's something very pure about it," he says.

World Cafe #TBT: 1993

Aug 4, 2016

For Throwback Thursday, we're re-airing a 2011 Liz Phair session on today's episode of World Cafe. Phair's debut album, Exile In Guyville, came out in 1993 and was a huge success, topping Pitchfork's list that year.

The pianist, composer and music ambassador Herbie Hancock is working on new music with a new band, and he's about to present the first taste of it in live performance.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

Imarhan is a crew of young musicians from Tamanrasset in southern Algeria. The band has a direct family relationship with Tuareg rock trailblazers Tinariwen: Not only is one of Tinariwen's members, Eyadou Ag Leche, a cousin of Imarhan's frontman, but he also has production and co-writing credits on the younger band's new album.

Imarhan integrates the hypnotic riffs and relentless percussion of traditional Tuareg music with modern elements to create something fresh, as you can hear on "Tarha Tadagh."

A Moon Shaped Pool, Radiohead's ninth and quietest record, owes much of its sound to the band's visionary guitarist, violist, electronics wiz and arranger Jonny Greenwood. On this week's All Songs +1 podcast I talk with him about how A Moon Shaped Pool came to be.

It's taken Blind Pilot five years to release a follow-up to 2011's We Are The Tide, and the result befits a group that moves at its own pace: And Then Like Lions unfurls slowly and gracefully, its energy directed more toward richness of sound than speed or force. The Portland, Ore., band makes wistful late-summer music — songs of reflection and connection, carried out in a subtle swirl of strings, horns, pianos and voices.

When you're young, summers tend to feel endless and carefree. For many, memories of this age — when you have the freedom to attack a day with reckless abandon — still conjure a golden-hour glow in our minds. For Hockey Dad, that vibrant spirit and defiant charm fuels its debut album, Boronia. Messy and fun, the Australian duo's pop-punk bursts with chunky guitars and big riffs as they collide with yowling vocals and firecracker drumming.

First Listen: Of Montreal, 'Innocence Reaches'

Aug 4, 2016

When Of Montreal began in the mid-'90s, leader Kevin Barnes' influences were clear: the warm '60s pop of The Beatles, The Kinks and The Beach Boys.

The Thistle & Shamrock: Hot Picks

Aug 3, 2016

Some music is a perfect match for the hot days, warm evenings and cool sea breezes of summertime. Enjoy an eclectic hour of summer sounds, including music by Pierre Bensusan, Maddy Prior, Old Blind Dogs and more.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Oliver John-Rodgers On World Cafe

Aug 3, 2016

Originally from Virginia, Oliver John-Rodgers now lives in Nashville. That's where he's been developing his music from singer-songwriter fare into a style he calls "acid cowboy," which draws on elements of indie and psychedelic rock. His third album, Nashville Demos, sounds less like a demo tape and more like a fully-fledged studio album in its thick, layered production.

Julien Baker's music speaks to all of your nagging insecurities, the daily worries that nibble away at your well-being even as you try to suppress them. The title of her debut album, Sprained Ankle, hints at that sensibility: An ankle sprain might be a pretty mundane injury, but it's certainly going to keep you off your feet for a while — especially if, as she sings in the title song, you're a marathon runner.

In 2013, Nicole Wray and Terri Walker teamed up to form Lady, a pair of new-school R&B singers kicking a decidedly old-school soul flavor. Since then, Walker's peeled off — leaving behind Lady Wray, who cheekily nods to her new solo act with the title of her forthcoming album Queen Alone.

The Woods Stage at Pickathon is an otherworldly outdoor amphitheater built in a holler and surrounded by dense forest. The performance space, which looks like something out of a Tolkien novel, might be the most interesting venue in the country. It's also one of the most versatile.

On this week's episode of All Songs Considered, Bob Boilen and guest host Stephen Thompson play new music from Regina Spektor, experimental rap from Clipping, which features Daveed Diggs of Hamilton, and a great synth track from singer-songwriter Lowell.

Colvin & Earle On World Cafe

Aug 2, 2016

Singer-songwriters Shawn Colvin and Steve Earle have known each other for three decades. They were bandmates even before Colvin released her debut album in 1989, and Colvin covered Earle's song "Someday" for her 1994 album Cover Girl. But it was only recently that the two began touring and recording together as Colvin & Earle. They released their album Colvin & Earle, recorded in Nashville with producer Buddy Miller, earlier this summer.

If you were among those who ate up the fierce blues-rock track "Don't Hurt Yourself" from Beyoncé's Lemonade, then you know Ruby Amanfu's voice.

The Wood Brothers On Mountain Stage

Aug 2, 2016

The Wood Brothers appear on Mountain Stage, recorded live in Charleston, W.Va. Masters of soulful folk, siblings Chris and Oliver Wood are no strangers to music; Chris Wood is also one third of the genre-busting Medeski Martin And Wood. Growing up in Boulder, Colorado, their father, an alumnus of the legendary Cambridge, Mass., folk scene of the late '50s, encouraged his sons to play music.

First Watch: Angelica Garcia, 'Orange Flower'

Aug 2, 2016

"I went with him to dinner / and didn't even pay / and then he called me dude the next day!" sings Angelica Garcia to a giant papier-mâché monster in her new video for the song "Orange Flower." Garcia is from Los Angeles but relocated with her family to small town Virginia, where she found herself, seventeen and alone with all the time in the world to make music without judgement.

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