Music

Music

Among the qualities that make Brad Mehldau and Chris Thile a not-quite-unlikely pairing — virtuosity, curiosity, a natural drive to bridge divisions of style — the one that may run deepest is a sense of resonant, articulate melancholy.

There they were, Greenpeace activists hanging from cranes in the sky. The banner, reading "RESIST," unfurled within sight of the White House after President Trump froze EPA grants and ordered the environmental agency to remove climate-change research from its website. It was a potent image Wednesday, perhaps setting a tone for years to come.

Courtney Barnett's record label, Milk! Records, is home to a wide group of Melbourne talent, including the very fun three-piece Loose Tooth. Friends Etta Curry and Nellie Jackson have known each other since the cradle; they added bassist Luc Dawson to complete the band. The trio released Saturn Returns early in 2016. Hear songs from that EP and a conversation above, and get a look at the band's performance as part of World Cafe's Milk!

If you thought that a band named King Gizzard and The Lizard Wizard just had to make psychedelic music, you got that right. Out of the mind of leader Stu Mackenzie and the town of Geelong comes this incredibly prolific band that has put out eight albums in the six years it's been together. (That said, Mackenzie vows to never repeat himself.)

"Now we gotta work on what you're going to do between the songs."

Butch Trucks, a drummer who was one of the founding members of The Allman Brothers Band, died Tuesday night, according to his publicist. He was 69.

The group became iconic for its sprawling mix of Southern rock and jam-band improvisation — and Trucks was one of its rhythmic lynchpins. The Allman Brothers featured two drummers, Jaimoe Johansen and Butch Trucks. Their interlocking rhythms propelled the sound of the band in songs like "Ramblin' Man," "Whipping Post" and "In Memory of Elizabeth Reed."

Geneviève Castrée died in July. She made deeply searching music as Ô Paon and Woelv, and illustrated comic books with the same emotional intensity. She was also the wife of Mount Eerie's Phil Elverum and the mother of their child. A Crow Looked At Me, written and recorded last fall, is an album-length response to Elverum's past year, and today brings its first song, "Real Death."

If you want to move into 2017's second month with some fun, Chicago multi-instrumentalist Nnamdi Ogbonnaya offers a good place to start. "dOn't turn me Off," the latest single from his upcoming record DROOL, drips with positivity. It's the kind of song that makes you want to gather all your best friends and take on the world, and it might just be the soundtrack to your 2017 breakout moment.

Over the years, music fans have slowly filled in details about a hard-working, mostly anonymous collective of Detroit studio musicians known as The Funk Brothers, who were the backing band for many of Motown's hit songs. Less documented is what these musicians did when they were not in the studio.

When Bob Boilen and I sat down to record this week's podcast, the Presidential inauguration and weekend marches were still fresh on our minds and the songs we ended up playing this week seem connected.

After realizing in music school how simpatico their interests were, Olivia Hally and Pepita Emmerichs combined forces as Oh Pep!. The duo's humorous lyrics and off-beat instrumentation make for some very catchy tunes on its debut full-length, Stadium Cake.

First Watch: Charlotte Day Wilson, 'Work'

Jan 24, 2017

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When the nominees for the 2017 Academy Awards were announced this morning, La La Land racked up 14 nods, tying records held by Titanic and All About Eve.

He released Iceland's largest selling debut album ever in 2012, and now Ásgeir Trausti Einarsson, best known simply as Ásgeir, is back. Today we're debuting "Unbound," the new song from Afterglow, the 24-year-old singer's follow-up to In The Silence.

The strength of community radio depends a lot on the community itself, and that works the other way as well. Sarah Smith is one of the three co-hosts of Triple R Radio's Breakfasters program. Her job is to keep track of Melbourne's ever-evolving music scene. "People often say, 'Why is Melbourne the way that it is? Why is it seen as the live music capital of Australia?' " she says.

Don't tell Fraser A. Gorman that he sounds like Bob Dylan. He's heard it a few too many times, and his head full of curls certainly helps the comparison stick — but the Melbourne musician would prefer to be judged on his own merits. We like Gorman's 2015 full-length debut, Slow Gum, but we're really lucky to hear songs that will be on his new album in this session.

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TERRY GROSS, HOST:

Wire made three of my favorite albums of the late 1970s: Pink Flag (1977), Chairs Missing (1978) and 154 (1979). Now, 40 years later, this brash, sonically adventurous British band is back with "Short Elevated Period," a song from a brand new album called Silver/Lead, coming March 31, and they didn't let me down.

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