Music

Music

Mike Flanigin has been a working musician for two decades. His first gig was at a Holiday Inn in Dallas, Texas, followed by a stint in the house band at Antone's in Austin. And for eight years he made his Hammond B3 organ growl and purr for the crowds at the Continental Club Gallery.

Like Brooklyn and Northeast Los Angeles, East Nashville is a bohemian stronghold with an army of newcomers threatening its foundation. I'm one of those newbies, and every day I marvel at the creativity and plain love shared by the musicians who live here. But I also understand that gentrification is pushing out both longtime residents and impoverished younger talents, and that a perfectly prepared smoked-beet salad served in a bistro by an indie-rock guitarist-turned-waiter with a waxed moustache is no substitute for the time and creative space that affordable living makes possible.

Restorations' LP3 was a gorgeous, vulnerable and big-hearted rock and roll record with three electric guitars dialed to the lump in your throat. A year since its release, these introspective anthems about self-doubt and uncertainty still ring true and take on a whole new power live.

In the late 1980s, Los Angeles hip-hop group N.W.A created a sensation and controversy with their music, which was labeled gangsta rap. Like the group's story, the making of their much-anticipated biopic, Straight Outta Compton, is filled with drama.

Latin Roots: Gina Chavez

Aug 13, 2015

World Cafe's Latin Roots segment today features a performance by bilingual Austin singer-songwriter Gina Chavez. Chavez's latest album, Up-Rooted, has been well-received in her hometown, where she won the Austin Music Award for Artist Of The Year, among other honors.

Langhorne Slim On World Cafe

Aug 13, 2015

Langhorne Slim, a.k.a. Pennsylvania-born singer-songwriter Sean Skolnick, returns to World Cafe to perform songs from his new album, The Spirit Moves. Slim released his debut album in 2008, back when he was a solo artist; nowadays, he performs with a full band called Langhorne Slim & The Law.

In this World Cafe session — recorded at World Cafe Live in Philadelphia — Slim talks about his new life in Nashville, making a record sober for the first time, and the endorsement deal he signed based on his trademark hat.

The inimitable harpist and singer/songwriter Joanna Newsom released new music this week, her first since 2010's Have One On Me. Every aspect of Newsom's work is precise and impeccable: her intricate harp work, her striking, delicate vocals and her sweeping lyrics. It's no wonder her records come out four to five years apart — a tapestry as rich as the one she weaves takes time.

While the dub album has long been en vogue in Jamaican reggae — and in the disco — it's seemingly disappeared from the modern music industry model. Not so in the mid-Nineties and the early Aughts, when a string of genre-unbound outliers — full-lengths such as Mad Professor v. Massive Attack's No Protection, Godflesh's Love and Hate In Dub, Easy Star All-Stars' Dub Side of the Moon, and Spacemonkeyz vs. Gorillaz's Laika Come Home, to name a few — featured studio sessions that paired mixing-board maestros with great song-cycles.

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