Music

Music

What did we do to deserve new songs from both Paramore and HAIM? We are truly blessed this day.

Bob Boilen and I rarely know what each other is going to play before we record the show. This week, Bob didn't even know what he himself was doing because he was too busy to plan ahead.

In this session, we welcome Holly Macve from the U.K. She was born in Galway, in western Ireland, but moved to Yorkshire as a child. There, she lived with her grandparents, who influenced the title of her debut record, Golden Eagle -- a nickname for her grandfather, who was a classical composer.

If prayer is meant to soothe the soul, Jamila Woods's "Holy" is a bathtub balm of self-affirming joy. Like manna from HEAVN (her 2016 debut LP), a new visual for the song descended this week, and it's a hair-raising ode to single black women who've considered self-pity when the loneliness was too much.

James Elkington's debut solo record took a long, side-winding path to completion.

Update, Mar. 3, 6:49 p.m.: A rep confirmed to NPR that the band has cancelled its upcoming North American tour (dates at the bottom of this article). "Given the circumstances," a statement reads, "we unfortunately have to cancel our upcoming US tour dates. We hope to reschedule these at some point in the future."

Hip-hop-flavored indie-rock band Portugal. The Man joins us in this session. And for a danceable band of low-key, really nice dudes from Alaska, Portugal. The Man has stirred up some controversy. It all has to do with the super-catchy, danceable radio hit "Feel It Still".

Last fall, at the Web Summit tech conference in Lisbon, Portugal, the rapper Ja Rule addressed a small audience seated in front of the event's music stage: "I'll let my partner-in-crime here Billy McFarland give you all an introduction of what Fyre is." At the time, Ja Rule and McFarland were promoting an app that would, we now know, share its name with one of the least-successful music events in recent memory, currently the subject of a

Beyonce's year-end favorite, life-encompassing Lemonade will be thoroughly documented in a $300 collector's edition How To Make Lemonade box set. It will feature the album as a double-LP, with additional audio and visual downloads — oh, and a 600-page coffee table book with behind-the-scenes photos, a foreword written by Dr.

There's a presumption among some people who have little contact with old-time, string band, bluegrass and folk music that those are mostly stagnant traditions, stuck in some sort of distant, Arcadian past and locked into so-called primitive patterns. The truth of the matter is that those traditions can be strikingly elastic, and they continue to attract new generations of keen musical minds, like Chicago-bred banjo and fiddle player Rachel Baiman.

Last year, the Tony Awards were swamped, particularly in the minds of many who only follow theater casually, by the phenomenon that was Hamilton. It got 16 nominations, it seemed like (and was) a lock to win many of them, and every other Tony story struggled to get a little bit of sunlight.

Colonel Bruce Hampton, guitarist and respected elder statesman of the jam-band community, died Monday night after collapsing on stage during the encore of his own birthday celebration. He was 70 years old.

Kero Kero Bonito's Bonito Generation was not only the cheeriest pop record of 2016 but also one of the year's best. Spend 10 minutes with the trio's hyper-caffeinated, but no less thoughtful electro-pop and your day is automatically brighter.

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KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

After a six-year hiatus, Canadian singer Feist is back. She's out with her fifth album. It's called "Pleasure," but that's a bit of a misdirection. Reviewer Tom Moon says the album explores the quest for inner-strength in the painful aftermath of romance.

If the Fyre Festival had played out according to the immaculate hype of its marketing materials, attendees would be flying home from the Bahamas right about now, sunburned and hungover from the greatest weekend of their young lives, cellphones full of models' phone numbers, #latergramming their way to legend status.

Instead, at least one of those once bright-eyed festivalgoers has filed a lawsuit and ticket buyers are receiving apologies from event organizers, who now admit that the Fyre Festival "fell dramatically short of even the most modest expectations."

How has this not been done before? Even Metallica itself has covered "Enter Sandman" with classroom instruments.

Brother Ali is a prophet, plain and simple. Even if you're unmoved by his life story — being a legally-blind albino rejected by society who found identity through hip-hop and the Muslim faith — his music most certainly will move you.

For a band that used to write silly, self-deprecating punk songs, Sorority Noise has embraced its vulnerability with the wisdom that it knows nothing.

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