Music

Music

"Despacito" continued its magical run of success by earning four statuettes tonight at the 18th annual Latin Grammy Awards held at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas.

One way or another, you've heard Grover Washington Jr.'s saxophone. Perhaps on "Mister Magic" or another of his instrumental hits, like "Winelight." Or on "Just the Two of Us," the smash hit featuring Bill Withers.

The MGM Grand Hotel in Las Vegas is ground zero for Latin Grammy action. Most of the artists are staying here, so the elevator lobbies are jammed with people waiting for a glimpse and a selfie with their favorite pop stars.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Willie Watson feels his way through America's musical history by sliding an old bottleneck against the strings of his acoustic guitar. He finds it in the grain of his own voice, cultivated over 20 years of singing old songs his own way. First as a founding member of Old Crow Medicine Show and now in his own solo career, Watson has brought folk-based roots music alive for new listeners in the 21st century.

Goldenvoice, the foremost music-festival production company in the world, announced Monday it was severing all ties with Sean Carlson, founder of the Los Angeles-based FYF music festival. "Effective immediately," Goldenvoice president and CEO Paul Tollett wrote in the memo, which was obtained by the Los Angeles Times.

In 2011, Goldenvoice struck a production partnership with FYF Fest, which had experienced substantial growth and the pains that come with it.

Update, Nov. 16 at 2:54 PM: This post has been updated to include a statement from the medical examiner.

Update, Dec. 8 at 7:45 PM: This post has been updated to include the results of the toxicology report. The original story continues after the first paragraph.

As the days get colder and the sun sets earlier, sometimes you just want a powerful (if not angry) song to pump you up. Just in time for the chilly temperatures, pop artist Kimbra has released the funky, victorious "Top of the World."

In his new book, Matinee: All Ages On The Bowery, Drew Carolan presents his portraits of the Bowery hardcore kids of the mid-'80s ... the boots, leather, patches, buzzed heads and middle fingers. Below, we learn what they've been up to since.


Turn any corner in New York City and you are bound to discover something you have never seen before. What started out as a curiosity one late night in 1981 in the East Village turned into an ongoing photographic exposé on a thriving subculture, 30-odd years later.

Aussie electro-pop gurus Cut Copy brought their kaleidoscopic disco sound into our studio for a live set. "Black Rainbows" showcases the best of their new album, Haiku from Zero.

SET LIST

  • "Black Rainbows"

Photo: Davis Bell/KCRW.

Watch Cut Copy's full Morning Becomes Eclectic performance at KCRW.com.

This past Monday evening, hundreds of supporters showed up outside Philadelphia's Criminal Justice Center to protest a ruling that sent rapper Meek Mill back to prison over violations of his probation. There was signage, chanting and hashtags (#FreeMeek and #RallyForMeek) associated with the demonstration in hopes of getting the event trending online.

The Thistle & Shamrock: Chansons

Nov 15, 2017

From the "chant de marin," or sea shanties, of Brittany to the songs of the voyageurs of the Canadian fur trade, enjoy the French songs that extend branches of the Celtic music tree from the old world to the new, with artists Le Vent du Nord, Hilary James, and Chris Norman.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

We're in South Louisiana — somewhere between Arnaudville and Leonville — in the backyard of Louis Michot, looking out at his pond. In 1999, Louis and his brother Andre co-founded the band Lost Bayou Ramblers. And the sounds we hear in their backyard in the bayou actually appear on their latest album, Kalenda. So does music, of course; the band isn't here to play the cricket or the frog — more like Louis on the fiddle and vocals and Andre on accordion and lap steel guitar. But the music really does take you to a real place.

It's no secret that we're fans of The Oh Hellos here at NPR Music.

On a sunny, late-September afternoon in the garden of a guesthouse in Kabul, just beyond the armed guard at the iron gate, a couple of girls are tuning up for guitar practice. All headscarves and concentration, they stretch tentative fingers along the strings. Their teacher, a 56-year-old musician from Los Angeles named Lanny Cordola, sports own head covering, a green doo-rag holding in check a graying ponytail that drifts down the middle of his back.

This essay is one in a series celebrating deserving artists or albums not included on NPR Music's list of 150 Greatest Albums Made By Women.

November means different weather to different places, so it's presumptuous to assume that everyone is looking forward to an evening spent bundled up in front of the fireplace with a pile of fleece blankets and a cup of hot cocoa. But if you want to simulate the spirit of a cozy November night, you could do far worse than "Winter," the tenderly rendered new single from Irish singer-songwriter Rosie Carney.

Though every band aims to eventually become a headliner, touring as an opening act is an important step. It allows a group to reach new fans, visit different places and gain inspiration from the act it's supporting. It can offer visions of successes and challenges to come, both on and off the stage.

This is not your regular music video – it's a six-minute, miniature epic inspired by "Pleader," the closing cut on alt-J's album Relaxer.

Now, Now's breakout album, Threads, was not as much about breaking up as holding on. Its songs carried in them a weary recognition of how desire and nostalgia linger in the body and mind, and zoomed in on the brittle filaments that bind together people who have long since declared themselves better off apart.

Flamenco Is Alive After Paco De Lucía

Nov 14, 2017

The guitarist Paco de Lucía died more than three years ago, leaving behind an immense impact on flamenco music. He expanded what once was a very strict, traditional form by adding jazz and world music influences, and by collaborating with musicians outside of the genre.

Members of his last touring band, led by guitarist-producer Javier Limón, are currently on the road as the Flamenco Legends, revisiting the late guitarist's music while paying tribute to his legacy.

Los Colognes sound like they hail from some exotic European locale, but actually, they're from Nashville — where they relocated 7 1/2 years ago from Chicago. They fit well into the psychedelic jam band world, and recently released a third album, The Wave. Like the title, the whole record is filled with many water images and references.

The band kicks off the session with a performance of the song "Flying Apart." That and more can be heard in the player above.

It was my pleasure to talk music with Steve Winwood, one of the creative architects of prog rock. His career includes groundbreaking work with Traffic and Blind Faith; a solo career in the '80s; and writing standards like "Gimme Some Lovin'" and "I'm A Man" when he was still a teenager.

In this session, we hear songs from Steve's new double album Winwood: Greatest Hits Live, and we use that as a jumping-off point to talk about Traffic, Eric Clapton and more. Listen in the player above.

Pages