Music

Music

Happy Friday the 13th! On this week's New Music Friday, All Song Considered's Robin Hilton speaks with NPR's Ann Powers, Stephen Thompson, Lars Gotrich, and Sidney Madden about the best new releases of the week. Highlights include Wiz Khalifa's long-awaited followup to the 2011 pop-rap breakout Rolling Papers, the calming songs of Luluc, affirmations of love from the Dirty Projectors and more.

Featured Albums

  1. Rayland Baxter: Wide Awake
    Featured Song: "Strange American Dream"

Friday News Roundup - Domestic

Jul 12, 2018

President Trump is traveling this week. But that doesn’t mean the news has stopped. After leaving the NATO summit in Brussels, Trump traveled to Britain on July 12. He’ll spend the weekend golfing, and then head to Helsinki to meet with Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Find President Trump’s full travel schedule here, from The Washington Post

Like a lot of creatively restless high-schoolers in the late '70s and early '80s, Ben Stiller was in a band — in this case, a weird and funky post-punk band called Capital Punishment. Now that Stiller is a movie and TV star, Capital Punishment's one and only album, 1982's Roadkill, is getting its first-ever major reissue on Sept. 14.

Updated 2:14 p.m. ET

To see the best stories inside the Emmy nominations, you often have to look past the ones that often make headlines. The big nomination numbers were raked in by familiar nominees: Game of Thrones was the leader with 22 nominations, Saturday Night Live and Westworld had 21, The Handmaid's Tale 20. In comedy, Atlanta led with 16, but the next two spots went to first-year series: Amazon's The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel with 14 and Barry right behind at 13.

As a parting gift, Paul Simon will release a new album Sept. 7, right near the end of his farewell tour. Simon calls In The Blue Light a fresh perspective on 10 favorite deep cuts from his own catalog.

Neko Case's voice sounds like it originates from the belly of Mother Earth herself. In her music, you can hear the roots of trees, the wisdom of ancient warrior bones, the shift of tectonic plates, molten lava and placid water. "Have mercy on the natural world," she sings on the title track to her latest album Hell-On. It's her connection to and reverence of the natural world that stands out both in the album's lyrics and in the circumstances around making it.

Loudon Wainwright III On Mountain Stage

Jul 12, 2018

While many singer-songwriters have appeared on Mountain Stage, the show's host and co-founder Larry Groce notes in his "umpteenth" introduction of Loudon Wainwright III, "he is at the top of the heap. He's the best."

The first "destination" jazz festival took place in Newport, R.I., in 1954 — multiple days, one stage and gorgeous scenery. These days, Newport is going strong, as is Monterey in California, and the festival model has expanded to multiple stages and far beyond big-brimmed hats and lawn chairs.

For someone who has developed a reputation as one of this decade's most erudite and elegant acoustic guitarists, Nathan Salsburg has a curiously slim catalog of solo six-string work. In fact, Salsburg's endearing new album — functionally titled Third, as it's the third set he has issued under his own name — is somehow his first to feature only acoustic guitar.

Bugge Wesseltoft made his first ripples on the water in the early 1990s, as a pianist of careful touch and decisive instinct, working behind fellow Norwegians like saxophonist Jan Garbarek. The frame for his output at the time was ECM Records, which represented a sort of aesthetic worldview, especially with respect to a quality often evocatively pegged as "the Nordic sound."

You always remember your first romantic encounter. Left behind on the night stand of a rented lake cabin, dog-eared and water-stained, its lurid cover slightly sun-faded. Smuggled into your bunk at overnight camp by that one girl who knew the names for acts you never even knew to imagine, with tell-tale spine cracks at all the juiciest bits. Late at night in a sleeping house, silent save for the hum of central air, when you finally worked up the nerve to click on the "M" rated Harry/Draco fic whose summary had been tantalizing you for weeks.

The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) Jazz Masters award, bestowed every year since 1982, is often characterized as the United States' highest honor reserved for jazz. This morning the NEA announced four new recipients of the prize: pianist and composer Abdullah Ibrahim, composer-arranger-bandleader Maria Schneider, critic and novelist Stanley Crouch, and singer-songwriter and pianist Bob Dorough.

Great songs and tunes are always available to stream on ThistleRadio's 24-hour music channel. Span the decades on ThistleRadio with classic tracks from Battlefield Band and the Bothy Band, as well as Mary Jane Lamond, Session A9, Kris Drever, and Calan.

Mumu Fresh sings that the teacher arrives when the student is ready. During a recent trip to the Tiny Desk, she came bearing life lessons from the depths of her soul.

A regal combination of black power and Native American pride, Mumu Fresh — also known by her birth name Maimouna Youssef — is an abundantly gifted singer and emcee who prances between genres and styles. The Baltimore native fuses her rich multi-octave range and ferocious rap delivery with spiritually-inclined lyrics so potent and mindful they precipitated a wellspring of emotion throughout the room.

This week, musicians all over Latin America asked a lot of questions. Mala Rodríguez's first solo song since 2013 leads with the question, "Who protects me?" For La Mala, the question comes from an empowered, long-scorned woman. Gaby Moreno asks the same question, but for Central American immigrants. Other truth-seekers this week: New York-based Mexican singer Marrón offers a breezy respite and Cuban reggaeton (read: Cubaton) singer El Micha wants you to stop lying to yourself.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

For some years now, citizens of the U.K. have turned music chart manipulation into a cheeky tradition, the idea being to select a song and, largely through grassroots online campaigning (helped along by media coverage, like this very article), to make it the most popular song in the country. Past attempts include driving "Ding Dong! The Witch Is Dead" to the top spot on the singles chart following Margaret Thatcher's death — it reached No. 2.

"Stop asking musicians what they think." That is the opening line of the song "1933" on Frank Turner's new album Be More Kind, and a directive I was very happy to ignore when we sat down to talk about his music. Turner is clearly a deep thinker who values discussion and debate as fundamental parts of healthy society, in his words: "How do you have a conversation with someone you disagree with?"

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