World Cafe Next: Boogarins

Nov 2, 2015

Boogarins is led by Fernando "Dino" Almeida and Benke Ferraz, who began playing music together as teenagers in the central Brazilian city of Goiânia. The four-piece band's first album of home recordings helped earn it a "best new artist" award from Rolling Stone Brasil.

In today's World Cafe Next segment, hear songs from Boogarins' second album, Manual, recorded during a tour break in Spain.

Diane Coffee gives the kind of live performances you talk about for weeks after seeing. It's not that the band tears up the stage. There's no elaborate light show or other orchestrated theatrics. The main attraction — and the reason you'll want to watch and hear more — is Diane Coffee's fantastically flamboyant lead singer, Shaun Fleming.

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