Music

Music

World Cafe Next: Pinegrove

Jul 18, 2016

The thoughtful New Jersey indie-rock band Pinegrove is the featured artist on this week's installment of World Cafe: Next. The group features singer-guitarist Evan Stephens Hall, as well as brothers Jack and Nick Levine on drums and guitar, respectively.

Pinegrove's new album, Cardinal, is its sixth — and first since the release of a mixtape in 2010. Hear two of its songs as part of this segment, using the audio link above.

John Doe On World Cafe

Jul 18, 2016

John Doe has been a founding member of the L.A. punk band X, a solo artist, an actor, a member of the folk-rock band The Knitters, and now the author of a new memoir about the early days of L.A. punk, titled Under The Big Black Sun. Doe also has a new album out, titled The Westerner, on which he performs a song with his former wife and fellow X founder, Exene Cervenka.

Gregory Porter's healing soul music sends a message of compassion, and he's got a baritone voice that resonates love. When Porter visited NPR, we'd just learned that our colleague, photojournalist David Gilkey, had been killed while working on a story for NPR in Afghanistan. When Porter began singing the calmly beautiful "No Love Dying," he may not have known how much it would mean to us.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

When I first heard You Got Me Singing, a new record by Amanda Palmer and her father Jack, I thought, "How sweet. They probably sang many of these songs together long ago." Then I discovered how wrong I was.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Music Review: 'Wildflower,' The Avalanches

Jul 15, 2016
Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

We recently asked people what they think about new technology that can disable their phone cameras or otherwise lock away their devices while at concerts.

Carla Bley And Steve Swallow On Piano Jazz

Jul 15, 2016

Bassist Steve Swallow and pianist Carla Bley are both acclaimed jazz composers and performers with international reputations. On this 1996 episode of Piano Jazz, they team up to talk with host Marian McPartland about their combined repertoire of innovative music.

Guest Dose: Lindstrøm

Jul 15, 2016

A Lindstrøm DJ mix? Yes, you did read that correctly — and yes, we too were pleasantly surprised when one of the masters of Norwegian electronic music offered to make one for NPR Music.

For much of the post-Dylan age, and particularly in such self-consciously cerebral genres as indie rock, contemporary folk and Americana, artists have been more likely to command critical respect for cultivating their songwriting voices than for interpreting songs from others' pens. But John Prine, who was once pegged as a new Dylan, seems to be having a fine time toying with that modern musical hierarchy.

There's a point when a jam is just a jam, and when a jam becomes a journey... man. Ever since Chris Forsyth started The Solar Motel Band to fill out his long-form rock compositions, the Philly guitarist has proven his versatility not only as an instrumentalist, but also as a storyteller.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

U.K. soul singer Michael Kiwanuka took time off after the release of his 2012 debut to figure out what he really wanted to say next. He ultimately partnered with producer Danger Mouse to craft a new album, Love And Hate; you can hear Kiwanuka's growth as an artist in songs like "The Final Frame."

Set List

  • "The Final Frame"

On its fourth album, Ambulance, The Amazing has a way of unspooling melodies that don't grab you so much as slowly burrow under your skin. Playing with an unhurried improvisational spirit, the Swedish band lets ideas amble along and develop naturally; it takes time to explore the nooks of its songs in search of deeper resolution. That lovely, resonant quality conjures a meditative mindset suitable for solitary walks or the melancholic stillness of an early morning.

"...the Spirituals, in a limited degree, are still in the making."
-James Weldon Johnson

Headliners at the Essence Festival, which marked its 22nd Fourth of July weekend in New Orleans earlier this month, play in the middle of the Superdome, a cavernous arena that, as configured for the fest, seats about 50,000. Up on the stadium's plaza level, a cozier, less formal kind of show takes place. Four multipurpose party rooms deemed Superlounges, which each fit about 1,200 fans, serve as secondary stages.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

One of New Orleans musical gems, The Stooges Brass Band, headlines KSUT and Music in the Mountains annual Party in the Park this Saturday (7/16) in Durango's Buckley Park. As a warm-up, KSUT will feature their new CD 'Thursday Night House Party' this Friday at noon.

Whether they're second-lining in New Orleans, or performing across the country, the Stooges Brass Band immerse crowds in a high-energy, cut loose vibe that's contemporary yet deeply rooted in the culturally rich musical legacy of the Crescent City.

Tracing the origins of Columbus, Ohio's Connections would take you back to the mid-late '90s, when singer Kevin Elliott and guitarist Andy Hampel were out of high school and in a band called 84 Nash. The only band signed to the Rockathon label despite having no formal relationship to owner Robert Pollard's better-established pursuit (behind the mic with Guided by Voices), 84 Nash got to tour extensively with its benefactors.

Jane Bunnett knows a few things about Cuban music. She and her husband, trumpeter Larry Kramer, have been traveling to the island from their home base of Toronto for more than 30 years. They've collaborated with musicians there, as well as back home in Canada and on tours around the globe.

This week, World Cafe rebroadcasts some of its best sessions from the last several months. Listen in for some conversations and performances that garnered a lot of interest when they originally aired. You'll hear from up-and-comers, such as the gritty blues-rock trio The Record Company, as well as veteran musicians like Lucinda Williams.

SubRosa's music is a ravaging deluge of the heart. The Salt Lake City metal band draws no line between beauty and doom, as crushing riffs and a sweeping duo of violins weave in and out of guitarist Rebecca Vernon's thoughtful meditations on love and death.

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