Arts and Culture

Arts and culture

Just days after a monthlong hiatus from making megabucks-generating videos, YouTube vlogger Logan Paul is in trouble again for creating more questionable content.

By the time Angels In America got to Broadway in 1993, after workshops, a pair of west-coast stagings, and an ecstatically received London production, it played like the smash audiences had heard it was.

Copyright 2018 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

Copyright 2018 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

It sounds like the ultimate white savior movie.

Oscar-winning actress Brie Larson plays a young scientist who has created a new fast-growing super-rice. She comes to India to convince villagers to switch to this grain. There's Bollywood-style singing, dancing — and in one scene she even rides a white horse!

Who is that dour man?

Massachusetts' highest court owns his portrait — it hangs on a wall outside the chief justice's chambers — but the court's officials have no idea who he is.

They're hoping you might have an idea.

Benjamin Swasey, of member station WBUR, reports:

Paradigm Shift

6 hours ago

Welcome to the alternate dimension where Julia Louis-Dreyfus's hit HBO comedy about crying is called "Weep." We've changed one letter in a movie or TV title, and imagined what the new plot might be. Based on our new synopsis, can you guess what our version would be called?

Heard On Chris Hadfield: Ground Control To Major Trivia

The Tourists' Guide To Washington D.C.

6 hours ago

What DC landmark "looks a little bit like a missile?" During our Washington road show, a group of intrepid AMA producers interviewed tourists at famous memorials and monuments. Based on clips from those interviews, our contestants try to guess the landmark.

Heard On Chris Hadfield: Ground Control To Major Trivia

Our Nation's Capital

6 hours ago

Question: what do single-elimination tournaments and the International House of Pancakes have in common? Answer: They're both NATION-al! In the final round of our D.C. show, each answer contains the word "nation."

Heard On Chris Hadfield: Ground Control To Major Trivia

Winter Sports Science

6 hours ago

As a former downhill ski instructor and retired astronaut, Chris Hadfield is uniquely qualified for this game about winter sports.

Heard On Chris Hadfield: Ground Control To Major Trivia

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

SMITHS-sonian

6 hours ago

The Smithsonian is home to historical artifacts, iconic Americana, and all manner of weird pop culture memorabilia. We've rewritten songs by artists with "Smith" in their name to be about notable objects in the Smithsonian's collection— can you guess the object? For an extra point, name the artist we're parodying. And no, they're not all by The Smiths.

Heard On Chris Hadfield: Ground Control To Major Trivia

Podcast Or Fraud-cast?

6 hours ago

From reviewing board games to comparing stationery products, it seems like everyone has a podcast these days. Guess whether the shows described in this game are real or fake podcasts— or, as we like to call them, future podcasts.

Heard On Chris Hadfield: Ground Control To Major Trivia

When astronaut Chris Hadfield returned from his last mission in space, his body was "really, really confused." After five months in orbit, "You can't balance. You don't inherently know which way up is," the first Canadian to become Commander of the International Space Station told host Ophira Eisenberg at the Warner Theatre in Washington, D.C.

Gary Oldman is probably the frontrunner to win the best actor Oscar for his portrayal of Winston Churchill in the historical drama Darkest Hour, which is also up for best picture. This week, we dive into the film to separate its stately ... well, Oscar-ness ... from its actual virtues. Do actors get extra points for playing real people? Should they? How much does it matter if an entire film turns on an invented scene?

Some people may be planning to dine on kimchi and bulgogi this weekend in honor of the opening of the Pyeongchang 2018 Olympic Winter Games. The rest of us, however, are stocking up on Vulcan Plomeek Soup and blue-hued Romulan Ale as we prepare for the final episode of season one of Star Trek: Discovery on Sunday night.

Let the intergalactic feasting begin.

Veteran Hollywood producer Jill Messick, who in recent months found herself caught in the middle of the Harvey Weinstein scandal, has killed herself, her family said in a statement. She was 50.

Messick had been a manager for Rose McGowan in 1997, when the actress says Weinstein raped her — a charge that he has denied.

McGowan has been one of Weinstein's most vocal accusers and her public shaming of him helped bring other women with allegations to the forefront.

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode Peering Deeper Into Space.

About Natasha Hurley-Walker's TED Talk

Natasha Hurley-Walker explains how a new radio telescope helps us "see" without light. She says these telescopes can tell us about millions of galaxies — and maybe even the beginning of time.

About Natasha Hurley-Walker

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode Peering Deeper Into Space.

About Sara Seager's TED Talk

In our galaxy alone, there are hundreds of billions of planets. And Sara Seager is looking for the perfect one, a "Goldilocks" planet — neither too hot nor too cold — that could support life.

About Sara Seager

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode Peering Deeper Into Space.

About Allan Adams's TED Talk

In 2015, scientists first detected gravitational waves - ripples in space caused by massive disturbances. Allan Adams says this discovery helps answer some of our biggest questions about the universe.

About Allan Adams

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode Peering Into Space.

About Jedidah Isler's TED Talk

Scientists believe at the center of every galaxy is a supermassive black hole. Jedidah Isler describes how gamma ray telescopes have expanded our knowledge of this mysterious aspect of space.

About Jedidah Isler

A lick of cold, creamy gelato isn't just magic. It's mathematics.

"You have to respect the range," emphasizes Gianpaolo Valli, a senior instructor at Carpigiani Gelato University in Bologna, Italy, who has spent decades drilling aspiring gelato chefs on the right ratio of solids to water in any given recipe. (FYI: Solids need to be between 32 and 46 percent.) If your numbers are off, you're likely to end up with a disaster instead of a dessert.

A lawyer for the accused gunman in a 2015 terrorist attack aboard a Paris-bound train is asking to halt the release of a new Clint Eastwood film depicting how three American tourists thwarted the assault.

Sarah Mauger-Poliak, the attorney for Ayoub El-Khazzani, has asked that showing of the film The 15:17 to Paris be suspended until after a judge reviews evidence in the case.

How 'Homeland' Relates To Real Life

15 hours ago

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Over its past six seasons, the fictional Showtime series "Homeland" often tries to mirror real-world political drama. Last season, a newly elected president was given an ominous warning by an intelligence official.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "HOMELAND")

It's the biggest smorgasbord on TV. NBC and its related platforms are serving up more than 2,400 hours of Olympics coverage through the closing ceremony on Feb. 25 — a record for a Winter Olympics. It's all there in front of you, but figuring out what you want and when you want it is a challenge. Here are a few ideas on sorting through it all:

How To Watch On TV

If you lived in Atlanta in the late 1970s or early '80s, you heard this question every night: "It's 10 p.m. Do you know where your children are?"

The reason that TV news started broadcasting that question every night: Many people didn't know where their children were. Kids were disappearing. Their bodies would turn up in the woods, strangled.

With films like The Color Wheel, Listen Up, Philip and Queen of Earth, writer-director Alex Ross Perry swiftly established himself as indie-cinema's premier misanthrope, as if the literate class of Woody Allen movies had been body-snatched by caustic malcontents of John Cassavetes movies. Shot in 16mm, mostly in interiors free of electronic distraction, Perry's films are defiantly analog in their four-walled intensity, committed to unpacking the restive desires of characters who act on impulse and often look ugly in the process.

As is often the case, this year's crop of Academy Award-nominated live action shorts — several of them made as newbie filmmakers' calling cards — make up in earnest humanity for what they lack in technical sophistication. One way or another, all of this year's nominees turn on themes of terror — that's if you count the lone comedy, which speaks to the fear, fantasy, or wishful thought that psychiatrists may be crazier than their patients. Here they are, ranked from best ... to best-intentioned.

My Nephew Emmett

An NBA superstar, a Disney powerhouse and a beloved children's book author make up some of the Oscar nominees for best animated short this year, and you can watch them all in theaters before the ceremony.

If Beatrix Potter were reborn as dean of students at Lake District U., the latest version of Peter Rabbit would represent her worst nightmare. This frat-bunny comedy is a part-CGI Animal House that revels in theft, gluttony, vandalism, and absurdly destructive pranks. All that's missing is the scene where Flopsy, Mopsy, and Cotton-Tail filch the wrong kind of mushrooms from Mr. McGregor's garden and hop into a bad trip.

"Less plot, more ladders."

That's a philosophy espoused by a college friend of mine with a fondness for Jackie Chan movies. Chan is known for incredibly inventive action sequences in which he fights using whatever is handy — including, in First Strike, a ladder. But what my friend does not want from Jackie Chan movies is a lot of time unwinding a boring, byzantine plot. Less plot, he would demand. More ladders.

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