Weekend Edition on Southern Ute Tribal Radio

Scott Simon

NPR's Saturday news magazine.

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Author Interviews
3:27 am
Sat November 17, 2012

What Makes A City 'Walkable' And Why It Matters

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 8:04 am

Watching Mary Tyler Moore while he was growing up, city planner Jeff Speck saw a different view of urbanity. It stood out amongst the crime-ridden urban settings of other favorite TV series.

Millenials, Speck says, have an even broader vision of what city life means, thanks in part to Seinfeld, Friends and Sex and the City.The neighborhood coffee shops and carless characters show viewers a "walkable" city.

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Movie Interviews
3:27 am
Sat November 17, 2012

Tom Stoppard, On Adapting 'Anna' And Defining Love

Keira Knightly stars as the title character in Joe Wright's adaptation of Leo Tolstoy's Anna Karenina.
Laurie Sparham Focus Features

Originally published on Sat November 17, 2012 5:48 am

Leo Tolstoy's Anna Karenina weighs in at close to 1,000 pages, whatever the translation. And since it appeared in the 1870s, it has often been acclaimed as one of the finest novels ever written. It's also been adapted for film or television at least a dozen times — including a sweeping and highly theatrical new version directed by Joe Wright.

Keira Knightley plays the unhappily married Anna, with Jude Law as her chilly, correct husband, and Aaron Taylor-Johnson as Count Vronsky, the dashing cavalry officer whose love for Anna leads to tragedy.

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Movies
3:27 am
Sat November 17, 2012

Plummer Portrays One Of The Greats, Again

Theo Wargo Getty Images

Originally published on Sat November 17, 2012 4:40 pm

In 1942, the legendary actor John Barrymore prowled the stage of an empty Broadway theater to prepare for an audition. He wanted to revive his first great performance as Richard III, but that night, Barrymore also opened the traveling trunk of his overstuffed, fabulous and troubled life.

Christopher Plummer won the Tony Award for best actor for his performance of this lion of the stage. Now, he's committed that performance to film.

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Music Interviews
11:03 pm
Fri November 16, 2012

Vintage Trouble: Rock 'N' Roll Finds Its Soul

Vintage Trouble recently reissued its 2010 debut, The Bomb Shelter Sessions.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat November 17, 2012 5:48 am

Vintage Trouble has enjoyed a pretty quick rise since forming just two years ago.

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Sports
9:29 am
Sat November 10, 2012

Sports: A Possible Super Bowl Preview And Letting Go

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is Weekend Edition from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Time for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SIMON: The NFL season at the half-way point. Big game this weekend. Sunday, tomorrow night, two 7-1 teams in a classic face-off. Ha-ha. One of them's the Bears. In college football, Notre Dame and Kansas State are in the top 5. What is this, 1997? And the L.A. Lakers send their coach packing. Are they already chanting ohm in Santa Monica?

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Politics
9:29 am
Sat November 10, 2012

In Second Term, Obama Has New Opportunity

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

With his election victory behind him, President Obama now turns his focus to planning his second term. He again faces a divided Congress - a Republican-controlled House and a Senate led by Democrats. But a second term presents an opportunity for the president try to set a new agenda and maybe change his approach to governing.

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U.S.
9:29 am
Sat November 10, 2012

BBQ Support: Feeding Fellow Americans After Sandy

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Twelve days after Hurricane Sandy smacked the eastern seaboard and beyond, tens of thousands of people still lack basic necessities - food, water, even shelter. NPR's Richard Gonzales sent us this postcard about three men from Chicago who took it upon themselves to bring some comfort to Sandy's victims.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHATTER)

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Middle East
9:29 am
Sat November 10, 2012

Fractured Syrian Opposition Eyed Warily

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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U.S.
9:29 am
Sat November 10, 2012

Grab And Go: N.J. Residents Get Quick Trip Home

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. In parts of New York and New Jersey, life is returning to the way it was before Hurricane Sandy hit. Power has been restored. Schools have reopened. But there are still thousands of people without electricity and areas where homes are unlivable. This is the case of New Jersey's barrier islands. Yesterday, residents of Seaside Heights returned to their homes for the first time since the storm struck.

Scott Gurian of New Jersey Public Radio was with them and filed this report.

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Simon Says
8:23 am
Sat November 10, 2012

Making A Case For Closer Contact In Congress

From left, Sens. Max Baucus (D-Mont.), Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) and Sen. Jim Webb (D-Va.) await President Obama's State of the Union address in January 2011, when a bipartisan seating arrangement symbolically suggested a more cooperative spirit among lawmakers.
Brendan Smialowski Getty Images

Originally published on Sat November 10, 2012 12:32 pm

Gridlock is the term many use to describe what happens when legislation gets stalled in the U.S. Congress.

But gridlock suggests that people in Congress at least run into each other. I've had enough casual, personal conversations with representatives in both parties in recent years to begin to think a more critical problem might be that politicians of opposing parties are almost strangers to each other.

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