Morning Edition on Four Corners

Weekdays 6:00-9:00 AM
Steve Inskeep & Renee Montagne

Two hour in-depth news program from National Public Radio.

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NPR Story
2:57 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Congress Returns Facing Work Besides Syria Resolution

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 5:25 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Now, when Representative Cole and his colleagues return to Capitol Hill today, they will hear about Syria from administration officials.

NPR congressional correspondent Tamara Keith reports.

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NPR Story
2:57 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Rep. Cole Weighs In On Syria Resolution

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 5:25 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. Seeking to win support in Congress for air strikes on Syria, President Obama addresses the nation tomorrow and also gives a series of TV interviews today. Syrian president Bashar al-Assad is also going to America's airwaves. Asked on CBS if a strike on his country could provoke a retaliation involving chemical weapons, this was his response.

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Around the Nation
1:31 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Trail Life USA, The 'Other' Boy Scouts Of America

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 10:49 am

A new faith-based group for boys is taking shape, just three months after the Boy Scouts of America decided to change its membership policy to allow gay youth to join.

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All Tech Considered
1:30 am
Mon September 9, 2013

It's OK To Protest In China, Just Don't March

Security guards stand outside newspaper offices in Guangdong province in January, where banners and flowers were laid in protest of censorship.
AP

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 11:12 am

Thousands of messages posted on the Internet every day in China get censored. Until now, little has been known about how the Chinese censorship machine works — except that it is comprehensive.

"It probably is the largest effort ever to selectively censor human expression," says Harvard University social scientist Gary King. "They don't censor everything. There are millions of Chinese [who] talk about millions of things. But the effort to prune the Internet of certain kinds of information is unprecedented."

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Parallels
1:29 am
Mon September 9, 2013

How To Build An Afghan Army, In A Million Difficult Steps

Afghan soldiers and contractors are taught about the workings of a diesel-powered electrical generator at Forward Operating Base Nolay in Helmand province.
Sean Carberry NPR

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 10:57 am

It's 8 a.m. on a recent day at Forward Operating Base Nolay, a small Marine outpost in Taliban-infested Sangin District of southern Afghanistan's Helmand province. The Marines are in the process of caffeinating and preparing for the day.

Suddenly, explosions and gunfire ring out. The Marines don't run for their weapons or bunkers for that matter. They don't even flinch.

"We can sit here and we can have a cup of coffee when there's booms going on, we're not concerned about it," says Lt. Col. Jonathan Loney.

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Shots - Health News
1:28 am
Mon September 9, 2013

From Birth, Our Microbes Become As Personal As A Fingerprint

We may not see them, but we need them.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 11:58 am

Look in the mirror and you won't see your microbiome. But it's there with you from the day you are born. Over time, those bacteria, viruses and fungi multiply until they outnumber your own cells 10 to 1.

As babies, the microbes may teach our immune systems how to fight off bad bugs that make us sick and ignore things that aren't a threat.

We get our first dose of microbes from our mothers, both in the birth canal and in breast milk. Family members tend to have similar microbiomes.

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Middle East
5:23 am
Fri September 6, 2013

White House 'Exhausts' Diplomatic Options On Syria

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 10:40 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

A single sentence sums up President Obama's challenge in winning congressional support for a strike on Syria. Congressman Elijah Cummings said it yesterday on NPR's TELL ME MORE.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED INTERVIEW)

REPRESENTATIVE ELIJAH CUMMINGS: Let me tell something. When you've got 97 percent of your constituents saying no, it's kind of hard to say yes.

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Around the Nation
5:21 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Florida's Byler Sextuplets Turn Six Years Old

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 10:40 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Florida's first sextuplets turn 6 this week. And the Byler kids have also started kindergarten - each in separate classrooms.

Apparently, it's been a tough transition with a lot of tears. It's the first time the five brothers and one sister have been on their own since they were born. It also made more work for their mother. She had to bake 120 cupcakes so that each of the six children would have enough for each classroom party.

Around the Nation
4:59 am
Fri September 6, 2013

It Could Soon Be Drone Hunting Season

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 10:40 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

It may soon be drone hunting season. Deer Trail, Colorado, is considering a plan to issue hunting licenses for drones. It's a protest against federal surveillance. And even though the proposal has not passed, the Denver Post says 983 people applied. Now, you'd think the federal government would laugh off this notion that there would ever be a drone over Deer Trail. Instead, officials have warned against shooting them.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Parallels
3:05 am
Fri September 6, 2013

India's New Central Banker Steps Into A Perfect Storm

Raghuram Rajan, the new head of the Reserve Bank of India, has his work cut out for him. India's economic growth has crashed, its currency has plunged and prices are up.
Rajanish Kakade AP

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 6:54 pm

Raghuram Rajan, the new governor of India's central bank, swept into office this week infusing a sense of optimism.

He announced hard-headed measures Wednesday that remove uncertainty that has characterized the Reserve Bank of India's moves.

By Friday, Indian equities and the rupee were clawing back.

But analysts say the exuberance — and honeymoon with the suave MIT-trained economist — is unlikely to last.

After decadelong high growth rates, India is now the sick man of Asia.

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