All Things Considered on Four Corners Public Radio

Weekday Afternoons from 4 to 6
Melissa Block, Michele Norris, Robert Siegel

Two-hour in depth news program from National Public Radio.

Local Host(s): 
Jim Belcher
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Composer ID: 
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Africa
3:58 pm
Wed September 12, 2012

Many Questions Remain After U.S. Consulate Attack

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

In this hour of the program, we remember Christopher Stevens, the first sitting U.S. ambassador killed in more than 30 years. And we'll explore how the attacks in Libya and Egypt have become fodder for political debate.

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Religion
3:58 pm
Wed September 12, 2012

Anti-Islam Film May Be Connected To Libya Attack

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

We're going to hear more now about the film that was, at least in part, the catalyst for the violence in Libya, as well as protests in Egypt. Some news outlets are saying the filmmaker has gone into hiding.

As NPR's Elizabeth Blair reports, very few people have actually seen the supposed two-hour movie, if it exists at all.

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Presidential Race
3:58 pm
Wed September 12, 2012

Romney Criticizes Obama's Response To Libya Attack

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It didn't take long for the attacks in Benghazi and Cairo to become part of the presidential campaign. Mitt Romney jumped in first. In a statement last night before Ambassador Stevens' death had been announced, Romney accused President Obama of sympathizing with those who waged the assault. The Obama campaign responded, saying it was shocked that Romney would launch a, quote, "political attack" at this moment. And the politics have continued today as NPR's Mara Liasson reports.

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Africa
3:58 pm
Wed September 12, 2012

U.S. Sends Marines To Libya After Consulate Attack

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

We turn now to Washington for more reaction to this brazen attack. The Obama administration is sending a Marine anti-terrorism unit to bolster security in Libya. It's also taking precautions elsewhere. The stepped up security comes as the State Department mourns its losses. NPR's Michele Kelemen has that story.

MICHELE KELEMEN, BYLINE: Shock and sadness hovered over the State Department as Secretary of State Hillary Clinton spoke of the devastating losses of four foreign service personnel.

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Shots - Health Blog
3:23 pm
Wed September 12, 2012

Portland, Ore., Becomes Latest Fluoride Battleground

Demonstrator China Starshine holds up signs outside of City Hall in Portland last week.
Ross William Hamilton The Oregonian/AP

Originally published on Wed September 12, 2012 3:58 pm

Over jeers and cheers from the audience, commissioners on the Portland, Ore., City Council voted Wednesday to add fluoride to the city's drinking water starting in 2014.

Portland is the largest American city that doesn't add fluoride to its drinking water. But some groups have raised questions about the possible risks from fluoridation and oppose its use.

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Digital Life
3:10 pm
Wed September 12, 2012

Facebook Could Be Powerful Tool In Targeting Voters

Originally published on Wed September 12, 2012 3:58 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Every election season Republicans and Democrats tried to rally their base and to go after undecided voters. They're increasingly using the Internet in Get Out The Vote efforts.

NPR correspondent Shankar Vedantam, who reports on social science research, joins me now to talk about how Facebook could become a potent weapon in going after the biggest untapped voting bloc in the nation. Shankar, welcome.

SHANKAR VEDANTAM, BYLINE: Hi, Melissa.

BLOCK: Who are these mystery voters, this untapped voting bloc that we mentioned?

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Technology
3:10 pm
Wed September 12, 2012

Apple's New iPhone 5 Is Thinner, Lighter Than Before

Originally published on Wed September 12, 2012 3:58 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Apple introduced its newest iPhone today, and it's thinner and larger than the last. The company also introduced a new line of iPods. NPR's Laura Sydell has more.

LAURA SYDELL, BYLINE: The new iPhone has a four-inch screen, and it's about 20 percent lighter. Apple CEO Tim Cook engaged in typical Apple boosting as he spoke about the iPhone 5.

TIM COOK: The thinnest, lightest and best iPhone we have ever shipped.

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NPR Cities: Urban Life In The 21st Century
8:46 pm
Tue September 11, 2012

City Life Snapshot: Music In Austin, Texas

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

A different take on city as melting pot now, in this City Life Snapshot from Austin, Texas.

BALDOMERO FRANK ALVAREZ CUELLAR: I'm Baldomero Frank Alvarez Cuellar, and that's a mouthful. And I am one-half of the owners of Rancho Alegre Radio.

BLOCK: Back in the '70s and '80s, Conjunto music was everywhere in Austin, and Alvarez is trying to bring it back.

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Asia
7:57 pm
Tue September 11, 2012

China's President-To-Be Mysteriously Absent

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

The man likely to be China's next leader has vanished, at least from the public eye. He hasn't made an appearance for 10 days and his conspicuous absence has unleashed a wave of rumor and speculation.

Our Beijing correspondent, Louisa Lim, reports on the mysterious case of the missing politician.

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NPR Cities: Urban Life In The 21st Century
3:36 pm
Tue September 11, 2012

Racial, Regional Divide Still Haunt Detroit's Progress

Part of the wall that was built in 1940 has since been painted over with a mural.
Detroit1701.org Collection maintained at the Univ. of Michigan by Ren Farley and Judy Mullin

Originally published on Tue September 11, 2012 8:20 pm

For many years — perhaps even decades — Detroit has been the poster child for economic malaise. Adjusting for inflation, per capita income in metro Detroit dropped more than 20 percent between 1999 and 2010.

Some analysts say regional cooperation might have helped keep Detroit above water when the car industry sank, but that entrenched divisions that pit the city against its suburbs, and blacks against whites, have hindered that.

A Deeply Entrenched Regional Divide

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