All Things Considered on Four Corners Public Radio

Weekday Afternoons from 4 to 6
Melissa Block, Michele Norris, Robert Siegel

Two-hour in depth news program from National Public Radio.

Local Host(s): 
Jim Belcher
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Composer ID: 
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Movie Interviews
3:44 pm
Wed February 13, 2013

Playing The Big Room: An Oscars Joke-Writer Reflects

Billy Crystal hosts the 84th Annual Academy Awards in 2012. Writing jokes for hosts is a tricky game, says longtime joke writer Dave Boone.
Kevin Winter Getty Images

Originally published on Tue February 19, 2013 1:45 pm

Hollywood's biggest night is in just a few weeks. People tend to focus on the glitz, the glamour and — of course — the gowns. But we thought we'd take a moment to focus on the gags.

Or rather what goes into writing both the jokes that fall flat and the jokes that soar. For a bit of Oscars Writing 101, NPR's All Things Considered turned to Dave Boone, who has written for the Academy Awards eight times.

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The Record
3:22 pm
Wed February 13, 2013

Saving The Sounds Of America

A 16-inch lacquer disc, a format used in the 1930s, from the collection of the Library of Congress. Most of the lacquer, the part of the disc where the sound was etched, has been lost to decay.
Abby Brack Library of Congress

Originally published on Wed February 13, 2013 7:44 pm

We've been able to record sound for over 125 years, but many of the recordings that have been made in that time are in terrible shape. Many more, even recordings made in the past 10 years, are in danger because rapid technological changes have rendered their software obsolete. So Wednesday, the Library of Congress unveiled a plan to help preserve this country's audio archives.

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Business
2:34 pm
Wed February 13, 2013

Airport Suites Offer Travelers A Place To Nap On The Fly

Minute Suite's 7-by-8-feet rooms offer Wi-Fi, a sofa bed, a television and a workspace. One traveler compared the small spaces to having an MRI done, but others say the idea is overdue at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport.
Courtesy of Minute Suites

Originally published on Wed February 13, 2013 7:44 pm

When there's a big snowstorm or a plane has mechanical problems, airports often turn into uncomfortable holding pens, with people scrunched in chairs, lying on floors, filling up restaurants and otherwise trying to find something to do.

That's actually good news for one company. Minute Suites is building tiny airport retreats across the country. The suites are already operating in Atlanta and Philadelphia. Next up are Dallas-Fort Worth and Chicago's O'Hare International Airport.

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Asia
2:29 pm
Wed February 13, 2013

How Do I Love Thee? Japanese Husbands Shout The Ways

A man shouts his love at an event in Tokyo on Jan. 29. The event comes two days ahead of Beloved Wives Day, a day on which husbands publicly scream their love for their wives before a crowd of onlookers. Husbands are also urged to head home early to express gratitude to their wives.
Kiyoshi Ota EPA /Landov

Originally published on Wed February 13, 2013 7:44 pm

Standing in front of a giant heart made of pink tulips, businessman Yoshiharu Nishiguchi tells his wife — along with a bank of TV cameras and curious bystanders — that he is utterly devoted to her.

"Rieko, I love you!" he screams, before yielding the spotlight to the next nervous husband.

"Miwa!" the man belts out, "I love you!"

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Music Reviews
2:20 pm
Wed February 13, 2013

Jim James: On A Spiritual Quest In The Digital Age

Jim James' solo debut is titled Regions of Light and Sound of God.
Neil Krug Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed February 13, 2013 7:44 pm

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Latin America
1:42 pm
Wed February 13, 2013

Hungry For Energy, Brazil Builds Monster Dams In The Amazon

Construction continues at the Belo Monte dam complex in the Amazon basin in June 2012 near Altamira, Brazil. Belo Monte will be the world's third-largest hydroelectric project, and will displace up to 20,000 people living near the Xingu River.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Originally published on Wed February 13, 2013 7:44 pm

Already Latin America's biggest economy, Brazil envisions a future requiring massive amounts of electrical power for its expanding industries and growing cities.

The response has been a construction boom that will install dozens of hydroelectric dams in the Amazon — and that's generating plenty of controversy, particularly from environmentalists.

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NPR Story
10:25 am
Wed February 13, 2013

Comcast Buys Rest of NBC Universal

Comcast, the Philadelphia based cable giant, announced a major deal late Tuesday afternoon. It's buying the 49 percent stake of NBC Universal that it did not already own for 16.7 billion dollars. General Electric is the seller and will also be selling some prized real estate as part of the deal.

NPR Story
10:25 am
Wed February 13, 2013

Comcast To Buy Rest of NBCUniversal From GE

Originally published on Mon February 25, 2013 11:19 am

Comcast, the Philadelphia based cable giant, announced a major deal late Tuesday afternoon. It will buy the 49 percent stake of NBCUniversal that it did not already own for $16.7 billion. General Electric is the seller and will also be selling some prized real estate as part of the deal.

Around the Nation
5:11 pm
Tue February 12, 2013

Fugitive Ex-LAPD Officer Apparently Barracaded In Cabin

Originally published on Mon February 25, 2013 11:19 am

Kirk Siegler talks to Melissa Block for an update on the search for former Los Angeles Police Department officer Christopher Dorner. A man that authorities identified as Dorner was holed up in a cabin near Big Bear Lake, Calif., on Tuesday evening. Hundreds of officers surrounded the home. Dorner is wanted for questioning in three murders and one attempted murder.

All Tech Considered
5:01 pm
Tue February 12, 2013

Electric Car Review Dust-Up May Put Brakes On Tesla Profits

Showgoers check out the Tesla Model S at the 2013 North American International Auto Show in Detroit in January.
Stan Honda AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon February 25, 2013 11:19 am

One of the long-standing knocks against electric cars is that it can be hard for the machines to hold a charge in cold weather. That's exactly what New York Times reporter John Broder says he found when he took a Tesla Model S on a road trip from Washington, D.C., to Connecticut.

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