Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

More bodies were pulled from the wreckage of last week's industrial explosion southeast of Beijing, raising the official death toll to 112, even as nearly 100 others were still missing, officials said.

Chinese authorities said that 85 of the 95 people unaccounted for were firefighters who responded to Wednesday's massive explosions at a warehouse housing hazardous chemicals.

Updated at 1:15 p.m. ET

Julian Bond, a key civil rights activist and anti-war campaigner who helped found the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and later served for years as the chairman of the NAACP, has died at age 75.

The Southern Poverty Law Center, where Bond served as president in the 1970s, announced his death in a statement on Sunday. The SPLC said Bond died Saturday evening in Fort Walton Beach, Fla.

Updated at 9:30 p.m. ET

An Indonesian twin-turboprop plane carrying 54 passengers and crew reportedly crashed in the country's mountainous and densely wooded Papua province, according to the Transportation Ministry.

There was no distress call from the Trigana Air Service ATR42-300. A search plane spotted the wreckage on Monday morning, the Associated Press reports; there is not yet any word on whether there were any survivors.

The New York Times and ProPublica report that the National Security Agency's ability to spy on Internet traffic "has relied on its extraordinary, decades long partnership" with AT&T, according to documents leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.

According to the reporting, the NSA documents do not identify AT&T by name, but by the codename "Fairview."

Updated at 4:35 p.m. ET

After thousands of flights were delayed as a result of technical problems with FAA automation at one of its centers in Virginia, the agency says the problem has been resolved and that flights are returning to normal.

Here's our original post:

Thousands of flights in and out of New York and Washington, D.C., have been delayed due to technical problems at a Federal Aviation Administration center in Virginia, authorities said.

Some delays were as long as 2 hours, 45 minutes, officials said.

Col. Jean Bikomagu, Burundi's ex-army chief who led the armed forces during the country's more than decade-long civil war, was gunned down in the capital Bujumbura today, the latest in a series of apparent assassinations that the United Nations warns could be causing the country to spiral out of control.

The BBC, via Agence France-Presse, reports that Bikomagu was killed at the gates of his residence and that his daughter was badly wounded.

Hillary Clinton reiterated her earlier remarks that she "did not send or receive emails marked 'classified' " on a private server used while she was secretary of state, calling the controversy over the subject the "usual" partisan politics.

Appearing at the Iowa State Fair in Des Moines with former Sen. Tom Harkin, who endorsed her on Friday, Clinton said "the facts are the same as they have been from the beginning."

After months of wrangling and brinkmanship, the Eurozone finally approved the first tranche of an 86 billion euro ($96 billion) bailout for Greece in exchange for a promise from Athens to put its financial house in order. It is the third time in five years that Greece has sought emergency funds to stave off default.

European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker said the approval sent a "loud and clear" message that Greece will remain in the Eurozone — ending concerns that the country would be forced out.

At least 40 migrants were found dead in the hold of a smuggling boat in the Mediterranean off the Libyan coast, as the Italian navy rescued 320 others.

"The dead were found in the hold," Cmdr. Massimo Tosi, speaking from the navy ship Cigala Fulgosi while the rescue was still ongoing, according to The Associated Press. Asked by RaiNews24 how the migrants died, Tosi said "it appears to be from inhaling exhaust fumes."

"They are still counting the victims," Interior Minister Angelino Alfano told reporters.

As The Associated Press notes:

Japan's Emperor Akihito has apologized for his country's actions during World War II, 70 years after its surrender, expressing for the first time "deep remorse" over the death and destruction caused by Japanese forces.

"On this day to commemorate the war dead and pray for peace, my thoughts are with the people who lost their precious lives in the last war and their bereaved families," Emperor Akihito said in a speech during the ceremony.

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