Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

Updated at 1:05 p.m. ET

The man who opened fire on tourists at a Tunisian beach resort, killing 39 and wounding 36 others, has been identified by the country's prime minister as a 23-year-old aviation student studying at the nearby University of Kairouan.

Updated at 4:35 p.m. ET

An African-American activist scaled the 30-foot flag pole in front of the South Carolina Statehouse early this morning and removed the Confederate battle flag that flies there.

Updated at 3:35 p.m. ET

President Obama, delivering the eulogy at the funeral of the Rev. Clementa Pinckney, said the alleged killer of the pastor and eight other congregants at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church hoped to "terrorize and oppress" but that "God has different ideas."

Noting the public forgiveness expressed toward white shooting suspect Dylann Roof by families of the victims in Charleston, South Carolina, Obama said Roof "didn't know he was being used by God."

At least 10 people are dead at a mosque in the Kuwaiti capital after an attack carried out by a suicide bomber wearing an explosive belt. The self-declared Islamic State has claimed responsibility.

The explosion at the Imam Sadiq Mosque in a residential and shopping district of Kuwait City occurred after Friday prayers, according to The Associated Press.

Reuters quotes the governor of Kuwait City, Thabet al-Muhanna, as saying more than 10 people were killed in the attack on the Shiite mosque.

Updated at 4:50 p.m. ET

A gunman at tourist hotel on Tunisia's Mediterranean coastal resort of Sousse removed a Kalashnikov from a beach umbrella and opened fire, killing at least 37 people, including British, German and Belgian tourists, according to government officials in the North African country.

Tunisia's health ministry said dozens were wounded in the attack.

The Associated Press quotes Interior Ministry spokesman Mohammed Ali Aroui as saying Tunisian security forces had killed the attacker.

Fighters of the self-declared Islamic State have killed some 146 people in a house-to-house massacre of civilians in the Syrian border town of Kobani, a conflict monitoring group says, calling it the second-worse such mass killing by the Islamist extremists since last year.

NPR's Deborah Amos, reporting from southern Turkey, says the Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights has spoken to witnesses who reported the shooting spree.

A proposed resolution to remove state flags containing any portion of the Confederate battle flag from the U.S. Capitol has been put on hold by House Republicans.

The measure, sponsored by Rep. Bennie Thompson, the only black member of Mississippi's congressional delegation, would authorize the Speaker of the House to remove any state flag that contained the Confederate symbol on the House side of the Capitol complex. Mississippi is the only state flag that would be affected.

The California Assembly has joined the state Senate in voting to approve a controversial bill requiring all children attending school to be vaccinated against measles and other common, preventable illnesses — effectively eliminating so-called "personal belief exemptions" that allowed parents to opt out.

Pope Francis, speaking on family issues, says that sometimes marriages are so damaged that it is "morally necessary" for a husband and wife to separate.

"There are cases in which separation is inevitable," the pontiff said at his weekly general audience. "Sometimes it can become even morally necessary, precisely when it comes to subtracting the weaker spouse, or small children, from more serious injuries caused by arrogance and violence, by humiliation and exploitation ... and by indifference."

Updated at 1:25 p.m. ET

President Obama, commenting on the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling today to uphold a key provision of his signature health care law, said after numerous challenges, the Affordable Care Act has been "woven into the fabric of America" and "is here to stay."

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