Jessica Diaz-Hurtado

Hurricane Maria made landfall in Puerto Rico in September 2017. Almost nine months later, some citizens remain without power or water, and a larger portion of the population still feels traumatized and abandoned.

Whenever Esteban Castillo visited his grandparents in Colima, Mexico, he'd sit by his grandfather's taco stand and watch him cook. He'd also see his grandmother carry her homemade cheeses on her back and go door to door, selling them in different neighborhoods. To this day, his grandparents still make a living off of food.

"They basically transform their living room into a restaurant during the weekends to make ends meet," says Castillo.

Editor's note: This is one of three segments in this week's episode of Alt.Latino. Listen to the full show.


On her days off, Claudia Saenz scours used record shops, thrift stores and yard sales, keeping her eyes peeled for records her parents grew up on. They remind her of her childhood.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

LOURDES GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

Marvin Lemus hated the skin he was in when, as a child, he didn't see himself represented on TV or in the movies. So when he was 8 years old, he decided to become a filmmaker.

For Brazilian vocalist Liniker Barros, it's almost impossible to avoid politics. As a trans black woman fronting one of Brazil's most compelling soul bands, Liniker E Os Caramelows, she says her mere presence is a statement.

Looking to the future is the right way to start off a new year. In the video for the electronica-tinged Latin American folk song "Futuro," Café Tacvba looks beyond binaries to see time and the universe through an optimistic lens.