Don Gonyea

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So two former U.S. presidents, George W. Bush and Bill Clinton, shared the stage last night in Dallas, Texas. They did not talk about the current president. They did talk about finding future leaders to bridge the political divide. Here's NPR's Don Gonyea.

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It has been a very rough year for Uber.

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We're going to bring in another voice now, NPR national political correspondent Don Gonyea, who is following the special election in Georgia and just heard that conversation with Jon Ossoff. Hey, Don.

DON GONYEA, BYLINE: Good morning.

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George DeTitta, a retired biomedical researcher, is no fan of President Trump's.

"Well, the day he got inaugurated, I put on my Facebook page, 'Not my president,' " the 69-year-old Democrat says, sitting at a table near the window at a restaurant in downtown Buffalo.

DeTitta says he took the post down the next day, but he's been watching the Trump White House with alarm ever since. Even something Democrats felt relief about — the failure of the president and fractured House Republicans to repeal the Affordable Care Act — wasn't reason for DeTitta to celebrate.

In eastern North Carolina, residents who voted for President Trump are loyal to him. But it is not a blind loyalty.

When asked the simple question, "How is the president doing so far?" surprisingly, Trump supporters in Nash County often begin their response with what they don't like.

Eric Wyatt, a 21-year-old engineering student, was typical.

"I support what he's doing thus far," he said, before immediately adding, "I wish he wasn't such a blowhard."

In what may be the most unlikely meeting of the presidential transition process so far, former vice president, former Democratic presidential nominee, former senator and Nobel Peace Prize winner Al Gore met with President-elect Donald Trump on Monday.

Gore has spent decades warning about the dire consequences of unchecked, man-made climate change, while Trump has regularly called climate change "a hoax" during the campaign.

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Editor's note: This post contains language and photos some readers may find inappropriate.

I've covered presidential campaigns for decades. I've never had to bleep — or drop an asterisk into — a candidate's speech.

Until this year.

Take this Donald Trump quote from a rally in Virginia:

"We're gonna win with the military. We're gonna knock the s*** out of ISIS. We're gonna knock the s*** out of them."

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Now we're going to talk about the presumptive Republican nominee, Donald Trump. He talked about the Orlando attack during a speech in New Hampshire.

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The battle between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump for the White House is likely to center on the Rust Belt — the industrial Midwest where trade is a big issue for many voters and where the presumptive Republican nominee is predicting he will be able to cut into the Democratic Party's traditional dominance among members of labor unions.

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Donald Trump is going to be the Republican nominee for president. Today, John Kasich, the last of Trump's 16 Republican opponents, suspended his campaign. Last night, Ted Cruz did the same after losing the Indiana primary to Trump.

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: Thank you.

>>INSKEEPIn this country, tomorrow, South Carolina holds it's Democratic primary. It's a chance for Hillary Clinton to benefit from her lead among African-American voters. Here's NPR's Don Gonyea.

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Sarah Palin is back in the presidential race. Today, she endorsed Republican frontrunner Donald Trump.

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