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When Alicia Bognanno unleashes that glorious howl, you can't help but absorb everything she's feeling: the simmering anger, the built-up resentments and regrets all boiling over into rage. As the dynamic singer and guitarist of her band Bully, Bognanno is an undeniably potent force. Yet behind every snarl and throat-shredding scream into the void, there are subtler shadings at work, particularly when she's accompanied by her own harmonies. On the surface, they work to infuse pop melodies into the band's fray of guitars.

The only known Leonardo da Vinci painting in private hands is heading to auction.

The portrait of Jesus Christ, Salvator Mundi, was only recently confirmed to be by Leonardo. This piece was thought to be a copy of a destroyed original. And it's still not clear where the painting was, exactly, for more than a century.

When the Iranian nuclear agreement was reached in 2015 there was a hope — and it was just a hope — that the deal would lead to a more moderate Iran.

As tough sanctions were lifted, Iran received billions of dollars in oil revenues that had been blocked. The country's international isolation eased, raising the possibility that Iran's friction with the U.S. and some Arab states might give way to greater engagement, at least in some areas.

No one is talking like that now.

In this edition of Latin Roots we've got a session with La Vida Bohème. As our pal Rahsaan Lucas at AfroTaino Productions has said - think The Clash playing disco in Venezuela. La Vida Bohème makes anthemic rock and roll that exudes charisma. But at its center, you'll find political activism and hope in the face of extreme danger.

Apple is about to close a deal with director Steven Spielberg to revive his Emmy award-winning series Amazing Stories for Apple TV. With it, Apple is entering a world in which Netflix has been a leader. But now, new competitors to Netflix are emerging at a surprising speed.

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If you listen very closely to this next highlight, you can hear the sound of millions of U.S. soccer fans tearing their hair out.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

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Just a few months after a controversial tax on sugary drinks took effect in Cook County, Ill. - that's where Chicago is - commissioners have voted to repeal it. As NPR's Allison Aubrey reports, it is a big win for big soda companies.

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From dance tunes to Gaelic airs, the musical links between old world and new come alive with Scotland's Alasdair Fraser, Cape Breton's Dougie MacDonald, Ireland's Maeve Donnolly and more.

This episode originally aired the week of April 1, 2010.

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In Ticino, Switzerland, the streets aren't paved with gold. But the sewage pipes are packed with it.

And across the country as a whole, some $3 million worth of gold and silver is thrown out in wastewater every year.

The receipts from Bruce Springsteen's first week on Broadway are in. The Boss, over five sold-out performances, grossed $2.33 million — or about $466,000 per night.

Glaswegian quartet AMOR is one of the greater, and darkly pleasant, recent surprises in dance music. Leader Richard Youngs (vocals, keyboards) needs little introduction to followers of experimental sound art, with a body of work spanning decades and encompassing hundreds of releases — from ruminative folk (1998's Sapphie) to mournfully piercing displays of noise and tape loops (Advent) and points in-between both introspective and maximal.

Sufjan Stevens is sharing a rare outtake he recorded while making his 2015 album Carrie & Lowell. The song, "Wallowa Lake Monster," is one of several previously unreleased tracks included in an upcoming collection of remixes, demos and alternate versions of songs from that period.

Call it a comeback. After years of absence from the spotlight, Eminem returned to relevance last night with a fierce lyrical condemnation of President Trump.

If you spend enough time talking with your most cynical friend about politics, you're likely to hear this quotation from the 19th-century British historian Lord Acton: "Power corrupts, and absolute power corrupts absolutely." It's a memorable axiom, but one that's been a little bit mangled by time — Acton actually wrote that "Power tends to corrupt." The misquoted version still pops up, however, thanks to pessimists who think that history has removed the need for Acton's original hedge.

This essay is one in a series celebrating deserving artists or albums not included on NPR Music's list of 150 Greatest Albums Made By Women.

NBC's The Good Place is an unconventional comedy. It begins with death — with Eleanor (Kristen Bell) waking up and being informed by Michael (Ted Danson) that she's in heaven — The Good Place. Eleanor knows she doesn't belong there; she's surrounded by people who seem to be much better than she is. What now?

Watch Big Thief Perform In KEXP's Studios

Oct 11, 2017

Deeply emotional songwriting is not new for Big Thief frontwoman Adrianne Lenker. The band's debut record, 2016's Masterpiece, consisted of a number of character portraits that felt deeply intimate and informed by residual images from childhood.

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Austrian Law Has An Unexpected Victim

Oct 11, 2017

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"... photography was an act of mythmaking."

There's a sense of a museum exhibit in Peter Manseau's The Apparitionists. The centerpiece of the book is the trial of William Mumler, a photographer in Boston (and later New York) accused of defrauding people with his claims that he could take "spirit photographs" — portraits that included a spectral subject alongside the living. But no man photographs ghosts in a vacuum. Manseau wanders from room to room outside the trial to see how America got there.

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