NPR News

Misery loves company. Multitudes are no doubt making the last-minute scramble to finish taxes today. If that's the case for you, perhaps you can take solace in the fact that this tax misery is a long-lived American tradition. These photos from Life magazine's archives were taken by Alfred Eisenstaedt in 1944. He used a telephoto lens at a New York Internal Revenue information center to capture one doleful face after another. See the full gallery, and happy taxing; may the odds be ever in your...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JbBlyCqEJZY At a sometimes heated hearing today where members of the House got to express outrage, the man at the center of the General Services Administration scandal refused to testify. Jeff Neely is the regional official who was in charge of a 2010 conference in Las Vegas that has been flagged for excessive spending and waste and led to the resignation of GSA's top administrator and the dismissal of several others. And this morning he asserted his Fifth...

Is 'Tuna Scrape' The 'Pink Slime' Of Sushi?

Apr 16, 2012

The fact that there has been a salmonella outbreak among people who eat sushi isn't super surprising; raw seafood does pose more health risks than cooked fish. But the fact that the fish implicated in the outbreak is something called "tuna scrape" sure got our attention here at The Salt. According to the Food and Drug Administration's recall notice , tuna scrape is "tuna backmeat, which is specifically scraped off from the bones, and looks like a ground product." In other words, tuna...

The Justice Department and 41 Native American tribes recently announced a roughly $1 billion settlement. The agreement settles long-standing disputes over whether the federal government mismanaged tribal money and resources. Host Michel Martin speaks with Rob Capriccioso of Indian Country Today Media Network.

D.C. Mayor Says Residents Not Free

Apr 16, 2012

Monday is Emancipation Day in Washington, D.C. In 1862, more than 3,000 slaves in the nation's capital were freed. Host Michel Martin speaks with Washington, D.C. Mayor Vincent Gray about Emancipation Day, and why he says Washington still suffers from a type of slavery.

Could Billionaire Koch Brothers Ruin Cato?

Apr 16, 2012

Transcript MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. In a few minutes, we will tell you about a billion dollar settlement, years in the making, between the Justice Department and 41 Native American tribes, over what the tribes have called years of mismanagement of tribal money and resources. We'll have that conversation in a few minutes. But first we want to talk about one of those stories that, on first look, could come across as inside baseball, you know...

The big story at today's Boston Marathon is the weather — in particular the bright, sunny skies and temperatures in the 80s that have race officials worried about how well some of the 27,000 registered runners will cope with the heat for 26.2 miles. As the Boston Globe says , the medical tents are likely going to be quite busy today. And the Globe says that: "Typically, the Boston Athletic Association (BAA) gets 288 five-gallon bottles of Poland Spring Natural Spring Water at the first water...

A federal prosecutor who led the elite public integrity unit when the case against the late Alaska Sen. Ted Stevens collapsed has told associates he will leave the Justice Department. William Welch, who got his start rooting out public corruption in his home state of Massachusetts, has operated under withering public scrutiny for more than three years. Welch was promoted to lead the public integrity unit in 2007 and ran the show during the corruption trial of Stevens, who was the longest...

The housing market has a new frontier — turning foreclosed homes into rental properties. Some big-time investors are starting to buy up thousands of homes to turn into rentals. That might help shore up home prices. But some housing advocates are nervous. For decades, most single-family homes available for rent have been owned by mom-and-pop landlords. Sometimes it's the nice old guy up the street who owns a couple of rental homes, and some even offer advice on the Internet. But, it's not just...

What would Jesus do with the U.S. economy? That's a matter of fierce debate among Christians — with conservatives promoting a small-government Jesus and liberals seeing Jesus as an advocate for the poor. After the House passed its budget last month, liberal religious leaders said the Republican plan, which lowered taxes and cut services to the poor, was an affront to the Gospel — and particularly Jesus' command to care for the poor. Not so, says Wisconsin Republican Rep. Paul Ryan, who chairs...

Baseball star Roger Clemens goes on trial for a second time Monday on charges that he lied to a congressional committee about using steroids and human growth hormone. His trial on perjury and obstruction charges last summer ended abruptly when prosecutors mistakenly showed the jury evidence that the judge had ruled inadmissible. Clemens won a record seven Cy Young awards during his storied pitching career, but prosecutors contend that he used steroids and human growth hormone to prolong that...

Deadly 'Choking Game' Comes With Big Risks

Apr 16, 2012

Michele Galloway went looking for her son, Connor, one morning in their Webster, N.C., home to make sure the seventh-grader hadn't overslept. "I opened the door and I found him," Galloway said. "And he looked like he was standing up beside his bed. And I just said, 'Connor, you're awake.' And then I realized he was not awake." She looked more closely. "There was a little gap between his feet and the floor," she said. "And I realized, you know, he had a belt around his neck." The other end of...

Last year, the number of homeless U.S. veterans on a given night dropped 12 percent from the year before. But tens of thousands were still on the streets, and more could be joining them as troops return from Afghanistan and Iraq. President Obama has vowed to end veterans' homelessness by 2015. Homeless No More James Brown left the Army in 1979. And for most of the next 32 years, he lived on the streets in and around Los Angeles. You might have seen him: the dirty, disheveled guy trying to...

"Americans now walk the least of any industrialized nation in the world," says writer Tom Vanderbilt . To find out why that is, Vanderbilt has been exploring how towns are built, how Americans view walking — and what might be done to get them moving around on their own two feet. Talking with Morning Edition co-host Steve Inskeep about what is wrong with Americans' relationship with walking, Vanderbilt says, "The main thing is, we're just not doing enough of it." "We've engineered walking out...

One in four women has had a migraine. And, it turns out, the debilitating headaches affect three times more women than men. But why? Decades ago, these headaches were attributed to women's inability to cope with stress, a sort of hysteria. Now experts are starting to figure out the factors that really make a difference. Today scientists know a migraine is all in your head — but not in that old-fashioned sense. Migraines are biologically based, and they play themselves out as a wave of...

The Tax Man Cometh! But For Whom?

Apr 15, 2012

It's that time of year again – tax week. With the deadline for Americans to file their income taxes looming, there's a good chance you've heard or will hear from politicians, on cable news and on talk radio about those who pay little or no taxes. House Majority Leader Eric Cantor has said that we "have a situation in this country where you're nearing 50 percent of people who don't even pay income taxes." There are even those who say that there are nearly 50 percent of Americans who pay no...

The 237th anniversary of Paul Revere's famous midnight ride during the Revolutionary War falls on Wednesday. But long before Henry Wadsworth Longfellow made him famous, Revere was known as an engraver and a silversmith in Boston. Brown University announced this week that it had found a rare engraved print by Revere, one of only five in existence. The print was tucked inside an old medical book that had been donated by physician Solomon Drowne, a member of Brown University's class of 1773. "It...

Over 100 tornadoes touched down Saturday in the Great Plains, causing millions of dollars in damage across Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebraska and Iowa. Despite the wreckage, there were few fatalities, a result perhaps due in part to the National Weather Service's warnings. Russell Schneider of the Storm Prediction Center in Norman, Okla., offers his insight.

After Deadly Philadelphia Fire, Warehouses Blamed

Apr 15, 2012

Transcript GUY RAZ, HOST: In Philadelphia, a warehouse fire this past week killed two firefighters and left neighbors angry because the building was abandoned. The city faces the same challenges as many others across the country - it has too many big old and unused buildings. From member station WHYY in Philadelphia, Elizabeth Fiedler reports on the threat posed by vacant buildings. ELIZABETH FIEDLER, BYLINE: John Mahoney walks his dog near the site of the fire. He wasn't surprised by what...

Transcript GUY RAZ, HOST: Staying overseas, and to Egypt now, where election officials have stunned voters by banning three of the top contenders running in the country's upcoming presidential elections. Those candidates include Omar Suleiman, the vice president under Hosni Mubarak, the other two, a powerful leader from the Muslim Brotherhood and an ultra-conservative Islamist cleric. The announcement late yesterday has thrown the entire race into turmoil just as Egyptians were hoping to...

Transcript GUY RAZ, HOST: And if you're just joining us, you're listening to WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz. In Afghanistan today, the Taliban has launched a string of attacks across the country, including coordinated strikes in the capital, Kabul, that hit near western targets and Afghan government buildings. The Taliban says today's attack marks the beginning of what they call the spring fighting season, the period after the winter thaw when mountain passes and...

A few years ago, author, critic, and translator Daniel Mendelsohn was teaching the epic Greek poem The Odyssey when his father decided to take his class. Jay Mendelsohn, a retired research scientist, wanted to understand his son better, and understand his life's work. When Daniel decided he wanted to retrace one of the most epic journeys of Greek literature, Jay became his travel partner. Daniel, a professor at Bard College in New York, wrote about the trip for the April 2012 issue of Travel...

Amnon Weinstein first encountered a violin from the Holocaust 50 years ago. He was a young violin maker in Israel, and a customer brought him an old instrument in terrible condition and wanted it restored. The customer had played on the violin on the way to the gas chamber, but he survived because the Germans needed him for their death camp orchestra. He hadn't played on it since. "So I opened the violin, and there inside there [were] ashes," Weinstein says. Weinstein was horrified; were...

A Dispatch From The Titanic Memorial Cruise

Apr 15, 2012

One hundred years ago this Sunday, the Titanic struck an iceberg and sank into the Atlantic on its maiden voyage. At that very spot today is another luxury liner, there to mark the centennial of the disaster. Writer Lester Reingold is on board the memorial cruise, and he sends us this report. As the Titanic Memorial Cruise began, our ship, the Azamara Journey, pulled away from the pier and headed down the Hudson River. We gazed up at One World Trade Center. Though still under construction,...

Remembering The Titanic, From Where It Sank

Apr 15, 2012

Host Rachel Martin talks with Lester Reingold, a writer and Titanic enthusiast, just after he'll have attended a memorial honoring the 100-year anniversary of the Titanic's sinking from aboard a cruise ship, anchored right where the ship went down.

Transcript RACHEL MARTIN, HOST: This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. North Korea's new young leader, Kim Jong Un, stood before cheering troops and citizens today to make his first public speech. The address rounded off two weeks of celebrations to mark 100 years since the birth of the nation's late founder and comes in the wake of Friday's failed missile launch. NPR's Louisa Lim reports on a new approach to leadership in the world's most isolated nation. (SOUNDBITE OF...

Sports And Life: Head-To-Head

Apr 15, 2012

It's the first in a series of conversations between host Rachel Martin and NPR sports correspondent Mike Pesca. Pesca digs deeper into big sports stories from the week, and brings one wildcard story that stayed under the radar.

Transcript RACHEL MARTIN, HOST: To Istanbul now, where negotiators for Iran and six world powers say yesterday's talks on Iran's nuclear program represent a constructive beginning. They agreed to meet again next month in Baghdad. U.S. officials note there is still a long way to go before the world can be satisfied with Iran's claims that it's enriching uranium only for peaceful purposes. But both sides say they're willing to try a step-by-step approach to resolving the issue. NPR's Peter...

Congress Returns To Center Stage

Apr 15, 2012

Transcript RACHEL MARTIN, HOST: Congress returns this week after a half-month recess. Polls show lawmakers aren't getting a lot of love these days, and lately they haven't been getting much attention either, not with all the jousting going on in the GOP presidential primary. But now that Mitt Romney is on the glide path to the Republican nomination, we'll likely be hearing more from Capitol Hill, where the subtext is bound to be the November election. Joining me to talk about what's ahead for...

U.N. Observers Head To Syria

Apr 15, 2012

Transcript RACHEL MARTIN, HOST: We turn our attention now to Syria. United Nations observers are preparing to travel to Syria this week to start monitoring the fragile cease-fire between government forces and rebel fighters. The U.N. Security Council yesterday approved the deployment of a 30-member team. The monitors will have their work cut out for them. As NPR's Grant Clark reports from Beirut, military bombardment is reportedly continuing, despite an agreed truce. GRANT CLARK, BYLINE: The...

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