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1:41 pm
Tue February 26, 2013

It's A Trap! 4 Possible Presidential Pitfalls

U.S. President Dwight Eisenhower relaxes at the 18th hole during a golf game in Newport, R.I., Sept. 10, 1957.
Henry Burroughs AP

You are Barack Obama and you find yourself hacking away in the weeds of sequestration — and some frustration. What's going on?

After all, you won a second term as President of the United States. You withstood the hooks and slices of a nasty campaign. Your approval rating is on the rise. Over President's Day weekend you played golf with Tiger Woods. For an American politician, it probably doesn't get any better than this.

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The Two-Way
1:33 pm
Tue February 26, 2013

Liberal SuperPAC Under Fire For Tweets About McConnell's 'Chinese' Wife

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., and his wife Elaine Chao at last summer's Republican National Convention in Tampa.
Mike Thelier UPI /Landov

From NPR member station WFPL:

"A Democratic group is under sharp criticism for controversial online messages about Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell's wife.

"For months, the liberal superPAC Progress Kentucky has attacked McConnell and held demonstrations at his offices and home.

"Recently, the group turned its attention to McConnell's wife, former Secretary of Labor Elaine Chao, with a focus on her race.

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All Songs Considered
1:10 pm
Tue February 26, 2013

First Watch: The Zolas, 'Escape Artist'

Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue February 26, 2013 1:39 pm

In "Escape Artist," the new video from Canadian pop duo The Zolas, the band plays around with audience expectations about race, culture and sexuality. As frontman Zach Gray sings about his mysterious alter ego, a group of kids kick around their neighborhood, playing basketball, chatting up girls and passing the hours. One of them clearly feels like an outsider.

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The Two-Way
1:10 pm
Tue February 26, 2013

Pastagate: Quebec Agency Criticized For Targeting Foreign Words On Menus

In Quebec, a restaurant's use of the word "pasta" on its menu sparked a government agency into action. Officials who enforce rules that guard French as the official language now say "exotic" words can be allowed in some cases.
Timothy Hiatt Getty Images

Originally published on Tue February 26, 2013 4:15 pm

A government agency in Quebec, Canada, has come under intense criticism after attempting to get pasta stricken from a restaurant's menu. The move had nothing to do with the food: Officials said Italian words such as pasta, calamari, and antipasto should be replaced with French words to conform with the law.

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Commentary
1:05 pm
Tue February 26, 2013

Historical Vocab: When We Get It Wrong, Does It Matter?

Linguist Geoff Nunberg finds that in the film Lincoln, screenwriter Tony Kushner oscillates between old and modern meanings of "equality."
DreamWorks/Twentieth Century Fox

Originally published on Tue February 26, 2013 5:12 pm

Has there ever been an age that was so grudging about suspending its disbelief? The groundlings at the Globe Theatre didn't giggle when Shakespeare had a clock chime in Julius Caesar. The Victorians didn't take Dickens to task for having the characters in A Tale of Two Cities ride the Dover mail coach 10 years before it was established. But Shakespeare and Dickens weren't writing in the age of the Internet, when every historical detail is scrutinized for chronological correctness, and when no "Gotcha!" remains unposted for long.

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World Cafe
12:45 pm
Tue February 26, 2013

Richard Thompson On World Cafe

Richard Thompson.
Pamela Littky Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 3:08 pm

Richard Thompson started playing in "The British Byrds," Fairport Convention, when he was only 17.

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The Two-Way
12:33 pm
Tue February 26, 2013

John Kerry To German Students: Americans Have 'Right To Be Stupid'

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry.
Sean Gallup Getty Images

Originally published on Tue February 26, 2013 12:58 pm

In his first foreign trip as Secretary of State, John Kerry defended America's civil liberties during his talk with German students.

Kerry said that the United States' tradition of freedom of speech — even if it includes offensive speech — is a virtue.

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Favorite Sessions
12:29 pm
Tue February 26, 2013

Yo La Tengo: Still 'Around,' Thank God

Yo La Tengo performs a studio session at KEXP's studios in Seattle on Jan. 18, 2013.
Renata Steiner nataworry.com

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 12:24 pm

I always look forward to a new album from Yo La Tengo. The New Jersey band's music becomes a part of my life in ways that other records don't, so I was thrilled when frontman Ira Kaplan, drummer Georgia Hubley and bassist James McNew stopped by the Afternoon Show on KEXP to perform songs from their new album, Fade.

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All Songs Considered
12:25 pm
Tue February 26, 2013

New David Bowie, Phoenix, Wavves, My Morning Jacket Covers John Denver, More

Clockwise from upper left: Nathan Williams of Wavves, David Bowie, John Denver, Phoenix, and Kanene Pipkin of Lone Bellow
Courtesy of the artists

Originally published on Thu February 28, 2013 7:32 am

On this edition of All Songs Considered, we've got a brand new song from David Bowie, from his first album of new songs in a decade.

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The Salt
12:23 pm
Tue February 26, 2013

How The Food Industry Manipulates Taste Buds With 'Salt Sugar Fat'

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed February 27, 2013 10:46 am

Dealing Coke to customers called "heavy users." Selling to teens in an attempt to hook them for life. Scientifically tweaking ratios of salt, sugar and fat to optimize consumer bliss.

In his new book, Salt Sugar Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Michael Moss goes inside the world of processed and packaged foods.

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