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5:52 am
Fri March 22, 2013

Chicago Teachers, Parents Riled By Plan To Close 54 Public Schools

Chicago Teachers Union President Karen Lewis speaks outside Mahalia Jackson Elementary School in Chicago about the planned closing of 54 public schools. Opponents say the plan will disproportionately affect minority students in the nation's third-largest school district.
M. Spencer Green AP

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 10:43 pm

In Chicago, officials have released a long-feared list that places more than 50 schools on the chopping block. The public school district faces a $1 billion shortfall, and the mayor says many of the city's school buildings are half empty. Some angry parents and teachers say the plan will harm children and they'll fight to keep the schools open.

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The Two-Way
5:24 am
Fri March 22, 2013

Three Marines Killed In Shooting At Base In Virginia

The entrance to the U.S. Marine Corps Base Quantico on Friday.
Matthew Barakat AP

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 6:35 am

A Marine opened fire at a Virginia base Thursday night, killing two other Marines before turning the gun on himself.

Quoting Marine Base Quantico spokesman Lt. Agustin Solivan, the AP reports the shootings happened after 11 p.m. near the Officer Candidate School. The AP adds:

"Authorities entered the barracks early Friday and found the suspect dead of a self-inflicted gunshot wound along with a second victim. Solivan could not say what prompted authorities to enter the barracks, which are at the base's officer candidate school.

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Around the Nation
4:51 am
Fri March 22, 2013

Petition Calls On Congress To Dress Like NASCAR Drivers

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 8:55 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Around the Nation
4:43 am
Fri March 22, 2013

Town Board In N.Y. Revises Booing Ban

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 8:55 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

Lawmakers in Riverhead, New York heard the voice of the people, a very loud boo. The town board made news by banning people from booing at meetings, which apparently met with criticism since Newsday reports they have revised the rule. You may boo at meetings now, but there is still a prohibition against disruptive behavior. So, how to boo without being disruptive? Maybe this way: Wait your turn to speak and then say: My name is Steve. Boo?

NPR Story
2:26 am
Fri March 22, 2013

Obama Asks Young Israelis To Push For Mideast Peace

Originally published on Sun March 24, 2013 7:24 am

President Obama is urging both Israelis and Palestinians not to abandon long-stalled peace talks. The president has been practicing some low-key shuttle diplomacy this week.

NPR Story
2:26 am
Fri March 22, 2013

'Tiny Fraction' Took Advantage During Iraq's Reconstruction

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 8:55 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

All this week on MORNING EDITION, we've been marking the 10th anniversary of the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq. That invasion was followed by years of war and reconstruction, the war and reconstruction taking place at the same time.

And today, to get a better idea of the monetary costs, we speak with Stuart Bowen once again. Since 2004, he has been the Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction. And earlier this month, he released the final report from his office.

Stuart Bowen is in Baghdad. Welcome back to the program.

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NPR Story
2:26 am
Fri March 22, 2013

Kids' Voices Key On Both Sides Of Gay-Marriage Debate

The Rev. Gene Robinson, along with his daughter Ella and partner Mark Andrew, attend a news conference after Robinson was confirmed as bishop of the Episcopal Church in Minneapolis in 2003. Robinson was the church's first openly gay bishop, and his daughter is an advocate for gay marriage.
Eric Miller Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 1:21 pm

When the Supreme Court takes up same-sex marriage next week, much of the debate will revolve around children. Opponents have long argued that kids' best interests require both a mom and a dad. Recently, however, more children of same-sex couples have started speaking out for themselves.

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Research News
1:02 am
Fri March 22, 2013

Mosh Pit Math: Physicists Analyze Rowdy Crowd

Fans in the mosh pit during the performance of Liturgy at the 2012 Pitchfork Music Festival in Union Park, Chicago, on July 14, 2012.
Roger Kisby Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 8:55 am

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Movies
1:01 am
Fri March 22, 2013

Not Doing So 'Boffo,' 'Daily Variety' Drops Print Edition

Print versions of Daily Variety, like this one from 2003, will no longer be available on L.A. newsstands. Variety will continue online and in a print weekly, but the daily print edition is being dropped.
Kevin Winter Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 8:55 am

For eight decades, Daily Variety has been a Hollywood must-read for everyone from studio heads to actors looking for a big break. But the days of assistants running out to grab the "trades" are over: This week, the Los Angeles institution published its last daily edition.

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Business
1:00 am
Fri March 22, 2013

Google's Eric Schmidt Heads To Another Isolated Asian Nation

Eric Schmidt, Google's executive chairman and former CEO, stands near a statue of the late North Korean leader Kim Il Sung in Pyongyang in January. He's headed now to Myanmar, another largely untapped market.
David Guttenfelder AP

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 8:55 am

Google's executive chairman, Eric Schmidt, who went to North Korea in January, is making a short visit Friday to Myanmar, also known as Burma.

Why is the senior executive of a U.S. technology powerhouse visiting some of the poorest and least wired countries in Asia?

Schmidt will be the first top U.S. executive to travel to the Southeast Asian nation since it began emerging from decades of international isolation under a military dictatorship.

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