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Parallels
12:06 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Egypt's Bloody Crackdown Raises Specter Of Prolonged Battle

An Egyptian army soldier stands Thursday amid the charred remains of the Rabaah al-Adawiya mosque, in the center of the largest protest camp of supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi, that was cleared by security forces in Cairo on Wednesday.
Hassan Ammar AP

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 2:32 pm

In the wake of the deadly crackdown by Egypt's security forces, many analysts are no longer talking about a country struggling with democracy. Rather, they see a revolution gone awry and a military that seems determined to crush the Muslim Brotherhood.

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Book Reviews
11:41 am
Thu August 15, 2013

A Gossipy, Nostalgic History Of A Publishing 'Hothouse'

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 1:28 pm

In the world of book publishing, ravaged though it may be, the name Farrar, Straus & Giroux still bespeaks literary quality. It's a publishing house that boasts a roll call of 25 Nobel Prize winners and heavyweights like Susan Sontag, Carlos Fuentes, Joan Didion, Philip Roth and Jonathan Franzen. A lot of writers, past and present, have turned down higher advances for their books from other publishing houses for the honor of being an FSG author.

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Music Reviews
11:32 am
Thu August 15, 2013

A Forgotten Quartet, Reissued And Reevaluated

A new collection of Brahms and Mozart recordings by the Stuyvesant Quartet from 1947 conveys a kind of inward grace.
Jay Shulman Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 11:50 am

A movie last year called A Late Quartet told the traumatic story of what happens when a famous string quartet has to change personnel. But, in fact, most string quartets — like symphony orchestras, only more conspicuously — continually change players, because players retire, or die, or get more lucrative offers.

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The Two-Way
11:28 am
Thu August 15, 2013

2013 Wildfire Season Proving To Be More Mild Than Wild

Firefighters battle a wildfire earlier this month in Cabazon, Calif.
Jae C. Hong AP

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 1:31 pm

With 15,000 firefighters deployed and three dozen major wildfires currently burning in five Western states, this would seem to be a wildfire season for the record books. And in one tragic aspect, it is. But by most measures, 2013 is the second-mildest fire season in the past decade ... so far.

Here's the season to date, by the numbers (provided by the National Interagency Fire Center) and with some historic statistics for comparison.

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Parallels
11:05 am
Thu August 15, 2013

A Syrian Village Surrounded By Civil War

Rebels hold the central Syrian region of Al Houleh, but the area is surrounded by government troops. Supplies have to be smuggled in, like these fruits and vegetables that are being transported across Houleh Lake.
Rasha Elass

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 5:35 am

Before Syria's civil war, Al Houleh was a small, quiet farming region to the north of Homs. But a massacre last year, blamed on government loyalists, left several dozen villagers dead.

Since then, the Al Houleh region has become rebel-held territory, and government troops are choking it. Trapped in the siege are several hundred civilians, all of them related to the rebels.

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All Songs Considered
11:03 am
Thu August 15, 2013

Viking's Choice: Violins Swarm In SubRosa's Heavy 'Dead Empire'

SubRosa.
Brandon Garcia Courtesy of the artist

Doom is as doom does. No matter how many sub-sub genre tags you put on it — blackened, atmospheric, sludge, bedazzled (okay, I made that up, but what if) — all descend from Black Sabbath. But you knew that. Doom thrives on repetition, in both its riffs and its tributes. The Salt Lake City doom-metal band SubRosa isn't out to reinvent the stone wheel, but it does offer a unique perspective by looking back to America's melancholic folk roots for something darker and more soulful.

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The Two-Way
11:00 am
Thu August 15, 2013

What's Up With That, Doc? Researchers Make Bunnies Glow

Those are bright bunnies. (The photo shows the two that have the "glowing gene," along with their siblings.)
University of Hawaii's John A. Burns School of Medicine

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 11:44 am

Like cats and other animals before them, a couple of rabbits are now among the animals that have been genetically manipulated so that they glow green under a black light.

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The Two-Way
10:49 am
Thu August 15, 2013

'Mature' Galaxies Around Not Long After Big Bang, Study Says

Chart showing galaxy formation 11 billion years ago.
ESA/Hubble

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 1:42 pm

Astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope to peer some 11 billion light-years into space and as many years back in time have seen something they didn't expect: fully formed galaxies when the universe was still quite young.

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The Salt
10:18 am
Thu August 15, 2013

Even Carnivores Are Putting More Fake Meat On Their Plates

Burger King's veggie burger is among the many meat substitute options on the market.
NPR

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 11:34 am

From Bill Gates to Google's Sergei Brin, influential investors are putting their money where their mouth is. The pet cause of the tech world, it seems, is the need to find good-tasting substitutes to conventional animal products, like chicken-less eggs or in vitro beef, to avert environmental crisis from rising consumption.

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Beauty Shop
10:13 am
Thu August 15, 2013

Snooty Swiss Saleswoman Equals Racism?

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

I'm Celeste Headlee and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, we head to Barbados for a twisted family tale that spans centuries. "Sugar in the Blood" is the latest in our summer island read series. More on that in just a few minutes. But first, a visit to the beauty shop. That's where our panel of female commentators and journalists get a fresh cut on the week's news.

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