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All Tech Considered
2:42 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

Sportvision Wants To Take You (Home) To The Ballgame

Sportvision uses helicopter and water-based platforms to superimpose the national flags of competing teams over broadcasts of the America's Cup sailing competitions.
Courtesy of Sportvision

Originally published on Tue November 5, 2013 1:26 pm

These days, you'd be forgiven if you're more excited about watching the "big game" — whether that's football, basketball, hockey — on TV rather than from inside a sports arena. At least, that's a trend that the Chicago-based sports graphics company Sportvision is banking on.

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Shots - Health News
2:42 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

Oregon's State Exchange May Be Worse Than HealthCare.gov

Matthew Collier, an uninsured entrepreneur, speaks at a rally sponsored by Cover Oregon in Portland, Ore., on Oct. 1.
Don Ryan AP

Originally published on Tue November 5, 2013 7:51 am

As the federal government consumes humble pie over failures in the health insurance exchanges, some states that have set up their own exchanges are also struggling. Oregon has yet to enroll one single person, and it's been reduced to pawing through paper applications to figure out eligibility.

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Shots - Health News
2:29 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

Bariatric Surgery Can Keep Pounds Off For Years

Just knowing that someone is obese doesn't mean they would benefit from bariatric surgery, doctors say.
iStockphoto.com

Weight-loss surgery is becoming increasingly popular because it's the only treatment that pretty much guarantees weight loss.

There is very little evidence on how it will affect people's health over the long haul. But people who had surgery maintained substantial weight loss three years later, according to a study that's trying to figure out if it works.

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World Cafe
1:48 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

World Cafe Next: Jay Arner

Jay Arner.
Courtesy of the artist
  • Hear Two Songs By Jay Arner

Vancouver musician Jay Arner has played in all kinds of bands over the years, be they pop, punk or otherwise. When it came time to make his new self-titled record, he decided to take the DIY route: Arner moved into his studio and played everything on the album himself.

The result is a concise set of songs that highlight the multi-instrumentalist's arsenal of capabilities. Hear a pair of tracks from the album and download this week's World Cafe: Next podcast.

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It's All Politics
1:36 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

Employment Non-Discrimination Act Passes First Senate Hurdle

Sen. Dean Heller, R-Nev., at a 2011 news conference on Capitol Hill. On Monday, Heller announced his support for the Employment Non-Discrimination Act.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 4:59 pm

Update at 6:47 p.m. Senate Passes Bill:

With a vote of 61-30, the Senate voted to move forward on legislation that would prohibit workplace discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity.

The vote Monday opens the floor to debate on the bill and the Senate is expected to schedule a full vote by week's end.

Our original post continues:

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The Two-Way
1:29 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

Not An Earthquake: Quarry Blast Sparks Tremors In Chicago Suburbs

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 2:20 pm

Around lunchtime today, residents in Chicago's western suburbs felt the earth shake. As WLS-TV reported, they assumed it was an earthquake and the United States Geological Survey reported it as a 3.7 magnitude quake.

While rare, earthquakes do happen in this part of the country. This would have been a significant one for the area.

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Book Reviews
1:01 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

Female Friendship Puts 'New' Angle On Italian Classism And Machismo

The Story Of A New Name Book Cover

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 7:46 am

Some writers you read and move on, but every now and then you read one whose work knocks you back against the wall. This happened to me with the great Italian novelist Elena Ferrante.

I first encountered her through her scalding 2002 novel, The Days Of Abandonment, whose narrator, Olga, may be the scariest jilted wife since Medea. What makes Olga scary is not what she does, but what she thinks and feels, and her ferocious precision in describing everything from lousy sexual encounters to her not-altogether-maternal feelings about her children.

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Author Interviews
1:01 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

From Sulking To Sanctions, A Street-Level View Of Life In Iran

Iranian demonstrators march in Tehran in 2011, during a protest asking the government to intensify its enforcement of the Islamic dress code.
Atta Kenare AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 1:15 pm

Monday is the 34th anniversary of the 1979 storming of the American Embassy in Tehran, when Iranian militants took 66 hostages and held them for more than a year. U.S.-Iranian relations have been contentious ever since, but recent events have stirred hopes for progress.

Iranian voters overwhelmingly chose a more moderate president in June, and American and Iranian mediators are meeting to try to resolve disputes about Iran's nuclear program.

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Parallels
12:59 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

Racism Mars Russian Sports In Advance Of World Competitions

Spartak Moscow soccer fans burn flares and wave a flag with a swastika (lower right) during a game with Shinnik Yaroslavl in Yaroslavl, Russia, on Oct. 30. It's one of several recent violent or racist incidents at sporting events in a country that's hosting the 2014 Winter Olympics and the 2018 World Cup.
STR AP

Originally published on Tue November 5, 2013 1:28 am

Racism and right-wing violence are threatening Russia's reputation in international sports as the country prepares to host the Winter Olympics in February and the World Cup soccer finals in 2018.

The latest incident was a riot at a soccer match last week in Yaroslavl, between the local Shinnik (Tiremakers) team and Spartak, a squad from Moscow.

Fights broke out along the barrier between the opposing fans, then Spartak fans ripped up stadium seats and threw them at riot police who tried to drive the fans back with blasts from a water cannon.

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Code Switch
12:54 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

Author Catherine Chung: 'I Want To Embrace The Things That I Am'

Catherine Chung's first novel, Forgotten Country, was an honorable mention for a PEN/Hemingway Award.
Ayano Hisa Courtesy of Catherine Chung

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 2:50 pm

Catherine Chung went from mathematics to writing, though she says words were always her first love. She was named one of Granta's New Voices in 2010, and her first novel, Forgotten Country, received honorable mention for a PEN/Hemingway Award last year.

In Forgotten Country, Chung writes of a family with a curse that stretches back generations — from their time in Korea to their life in America. Since the Japanese occupation of Korea, each generation of the family has lost a daughter.

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