NPR News

Pages

NPR Story
6:07 am
Sat April 25, 2015

'I Lost A Hand And This Is Workman's Comp. ... I Didn't Lose A Hook!'

Dennis Whedbee, of Homer City, Pa., lost half of his left arm in a drilling accident in North Dakota in September 2012.
Jeff Swensen for ProPublica

Originally published on Sat April 25, 2015 8:11 am

The tattoos on Dennis Whedbee's left arm describe what he lost when the North Dakota oil rig where he was working blew out in 2012. There's an image of a severed hand spurting blood, framed by the word "LOST" in block letters and the date: "9-23-12."

The message underscores Whedbee's frustration with a workers' compensation system in which benefits and access to benefits have changed in North Dakota and across the country.

"I lost a hand at work and this is workman's comp," Whedbee, 53, says at his home in Pennsylvania. "Give me what I deserve. I deserve a hand."

Read more
Joe's Big Idea
6:07 am
Sat April 25, 2015

Hubble's Other Telescope And The Day It Rocked Our World

The Hooker 100-inch reflecting telescope at the Mount Wilson Observatory, just outside Los Angeles. Edwin Hubble's chair, on an elevating platform, is visible at left. A view from this scope first told Hubble our galaxy isn't the only one.
Courtesy of The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science Collection at the Huntington Library, San Marino, Calif.

Originally published on Sat April 25, 2015 8:11 am

The Hubble Space Telescope this week celebrates 25 years in Earth's orbit. In that time the telescope has studied distant galaxies, star nurseries, planets in our solar system and planets orbiting other stars.

But, even with all that, you could argue that the astronomer for whom the telescope is named made even more important discoveries — with far less sophisticated equipment.

Read more
Law
6:07 am
Sat April 25, 2015

Patti Reagan: Hinkley Still Capable Of Violence

Originally published on Sat April 25, 2015 8:40 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Race
6:07 am
Sat April 25, 2015

Protesters Plan To 'Shut Down' Baltimore Saturday

Originally published on Sat April 25, 2015 8:40 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Politics
6:07 am
Sat April 25, 2015

Surgeon General Vivek Murthy On Gun Control, Vaccines And Science

Originally published on Sat April 25, 2015 8:40 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Race
6:07 am
Sat April 25, 2015

To West Baltimoreans, 'The Largest Gang Is The ... Police'

Originally published on Sat April 25, 2015 8:40 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Sports
6:07 am
Sat April 25, 2015

Kansas City Royals Break Bad: The Week In Sports

Originally published on Sat April 25, 2015 8:40 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Deceptive Cadence
6:07 am
Sat April 25, 2015

Roomful Of Teeth: A Vocal Group That's 'A Band, Not A Choir'

Roomful of Teeth's new album is Render, out April 28.
Nicholas Whitman Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat April 25, 2015 8:40 am

The vocal ensemble Roomful of Teeth consists of eight classically trained singers incorporating Tuvan throat singing, Appalachian yodeling, operatic trills, rhythmic exhalations and whispered speech into music written by some of the most exciting young composers of the 21st century.

Read more
Music Interviews
6:07 am
Sat April 25, 2015

Colleen: For The First Time, A Hypnotic Composer Sings

For more than 10 years, the French musician Colleen was strictly instrumental. For her new album, Captain of None, she added her voice.
Iker Spozio Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat April 25, 2015 8:40 am

The French musician Cécile Schott's music sounds a little bit like someone dropped a baroque string instrument into a swimming pool.

Recording under the name Colleen since 2001, she's made music that is purely instrumental and focused on one string instrument in particular: the viola de gamba. But on Captain of None, she's added lyrics for the first time.

Read more
Parallels
5:59 am
Sat April 25, 2015

Flood Of Desperate Refugees Tests Spaniards' Tolerance

Migrants wait to disembark at the Catania harbor in southern Italy on April 24. In recent weeks, hundreds of migrants leaving Libya have drowned trying to cross the Mediterranean Sea to European countries, including Italy, Spain and Greece.
Alessandra Tarantino AP

Originally published on Sat April 25, 2015 6:07 am

Pepe Guerrero is a doorman at a high-rise building in Malaga, on Spain's Mediterranean coast. From his post he looks out at the turquoise blue waters — where hundreds of Arab and African migrants have drowned in recent weeks.

"They're people — human beings like us," he says. "Searching for a better life."

Read more

Pages