NPR Story
3:23 am
Wed April 23, 2014

Haagen-Dazs Experiments With Veggie Ice Cream

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 6:02 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Our last word in business is: Veggie Ice Cream.

Japanese parents trying to get their kids to eat vegetables can skip to desert.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Haagen-Dazs is testing vegetable-flavored ice cream in Japan. Flavors include tomato cherry and carrot orange.

NPR Story
3:23 am
Wed April 23, 2014

Security Situation In Eastern Ukraine Is Unpredictable

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 6:02 am

In some of the towns where pro-Moscow militants have occupied government buildings, it is clear that someone is giving orders. In other places, a state of near chaos reigns.

NPR Story
3:23 am
Wed April 23, 2014

Supreme Court Upholds Michigan's Affirmative Action Ban

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 6:02 am

Steve Inskeep talks to Lee Bollinger, a former president at the University of Michigan, about Tuesday's ruling. Bollinger was president during two earlier landmark affirmative action cases.

NPR Story
3:23 am
Wed April 23, 2014

How Hospitals Can Reduce Disabilities For Stroke Patients

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 6:02 am

Research finds when hospitals initiate rapid response programs to treat stroke victims, response time is cut and fewer patients die. The stroke patients also have fewer significant disabilities.

NPR Story
3:23 am
Wed April 23, 2014

Urban Libraries Become De Facto Homeless Shelters

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 6:02 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Whether they like it or not, libraries in some cities serve as homeless shelters. People come off the streets to find quiet and warmth. If libraries want to do something about this, they have some choices: They can put homeless visitors back out on the street. San Francisco libraries want to get them back on their feet.

Scott Shafer reports from member station KQED.

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Education
3:23 am
Wed April 23, 2014

In Tulsa, Combining Preschool With Help For Parents

Shartara Wallace picks up her son James, 4, from preschool in Tulsa, Okla.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 6:02 am

At preschools in Tulsa, Okla., teachers are well-educated and well-paid, and classrooms are focused on play, but are still challenging. One nonprofit in Tulsa, the Community Action Project, has flipped the script on preschool. The idea behind its Career Advance program is simple: To help kids, the group believes, you often have to help their parents.

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Kevin Kniestedt became the host of Morning Edition on WFAE in September of 2013. Prior to that, he spent twelve years in public radio in Seattle/Tacoma and Spokane, Washington, where you could find him on the air just about any random hour of the day. Kevin has spent time hosting both news and music, has interviewed the likes of Dr. John, Chick Corea, and Branford Marsalis, and has authored the list 1,000 Jazz Albums You Should Hear Before You Die. Kevin is also a huge sports fan, loves a good film festival, and can often be found indulging on a massive plate of nachos.

Education
3:03 am
Wed April 23, 2014

One Approach To Head Start: To Help Kids, Help Their Parents

Tiffany Contreras walks her daughter Kyndall, 4, to preschool at Disney Elementary in Tulsa, Okla.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 7:48 am

President Obama has called repeatedly on Congress to help states pay for "high-quality preschool" for all. In fact, those two words — "high quality" — appear time and again in the president's prepared remarks. They are also a refrain among early childhood education advocates and researchers. But what do they mean? And what separates the best of the nation's preschool programs from the rest?

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Europe
2:34 am
Wed April 23, 2014

Putin's Chess Moves In Ukraine: Brilliant Tactics, But Bad Strategy?

Protesters play chess in Independence Square in Kiev last winter. Some would say that Russian President Putin is playing geopolitical chess when it comes to Ukraine.
Dmitry Lovetsky AP

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 8:06 am

The game of chess is a national pastime in Russia. And you might say that Vladimir Putin is playing a high-stakes game of geopolitical chess when it comes to Ukraine.

Western leaders are plotting how to counter Putin's latest moves with economic sanctions. So to get some insight into what might come next, we talked to an economist who knows Russia — who is also extremely good at chess.

Putin Playing From A Weak Position

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All Tech Considered
2:33 am
Wed April 23, 2014

The Price War Over The Cloud Has High Stakes For The Internet

A Google data center in Oklahoma is shown. Google recently slashed prices for its cloud services; Amazon responded by cutting its cloud prices.
Connie Zhou AP

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 6:02 am

This week, our tech reporting team is exploring cloud computing — the big business of providing computing power and data storage that companies need, but which happens out of sight, as if it's "in the cloud."

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