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KSUT enters final stretch of capital campaign for new studio space

KSUT enters final stretch of capital campaign for new studio space Southern Ute Indian Tribe will match $1 million in all-or-nothing deal

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As a DJ, music and television producer, one-time NYU professor, founder of the online community Okayplayer — and, oh yeah, the drummer and bandleader of The Roots — Ahmir "Questlove" Thompson can't seem to stop adding hyphens to his job.

Editor's note: This interview contains language that some readers may find offensive.

Note: NPR's First Listen audio comes down after the album is released. However, you can still listen with the Spotify or Apple Music playlist at the bottom of the page.

Note: NPR's First Listen audio comes down after the album is released. However, you can still listen with the Bandcamp playlist at the bottom of the page.

DJ Koze doesn't do anything like anybody else, including growing more conventional. It's tempting to call knock knock — his first album of original material since 2013's woozy knockout Amygdala — the Frankfurt dance producer's soul album, or his disco album, or his vocal album. Like most things about Koze, it's got large elements of all those categories, but none of them stick definitively.

I went from really loving the music of Superorganism to being a transformed super-fan the moment they sent me an email ahead of their Tiny Desk performance asking, "is it okay if we [bring] inflatable whales when we play?" Now I feel like the kind of fan I was when I wore a yellow radiation suit to a Devo concert in 1978.

Allan Monga, a junior at Deering High School in Portland, Maine, traveled to Washington, D.C. to compete in the Poetry Out Loud contest on Monday. It's a national competition in which students recite great works of poetry, and it's run by the National Endowment for the Arts and the Poetry Foundation.

But Monga, who says he fled violence in his home country of Zambia, was initially barred from the national final because of his immigration status: He's an asylum seeker and does not yet have U.S. citizenship.

It's feeding time at Brad Felger's farm in Washington's Skagit Valley. And he's about to feed 40 hungry falcons.

Yes, falcons.

They're an important, albeit often unseen, part of farming in some states, used as a defense mechanism to keep away pesky birds like starlings, which love to eat berries and apples.

Since age 12, Felger has had a self-described love for everything with feathers, scales or tails.

"Falconers are, what's the word I'm looking for ... eccentric," Felger says.

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Traditional and Contemporary Native Music, News & Culture. Listen locally at 91.3 Ignacio/ 89.7 FM Northern New Mexico

Performances captured live on-air from the KSUT studios!

The Alpine Bank Community Matching Fund

A great way for local non-profits to double the impact of their message by reaching more KSUT listeners.

Attend an open KSUT Board of Directors meeting

The board meets on the 2nd Tuesday of each month in Ignacio